Salmon stock exploitation: Wales delays, while England acts

Salmon stock exploitation: Wales delays, while England acts

On the 14th June 2019, in response to troubling results from their own analysis of Severn salmon stocks, the Environment Agency (EA) implemented an emergency bylaw prohibiting the use of certain nets in the estuary and imposed compulsory catch and release on all other nets and rod and line fisheries on the whole of the river for the remainder of the season.

Richard Garner Williams, S&TC Cymru said:

“S&TC Cymru congratulate the EA on this decisive move and trust that the bylaw will be observed by all.” 

Somewhat worryingly however, until the Welsh Minister for the Environment, Energy and Rural Affairs decides to approve similar bylaws for Wales, proposed eighteen months ago by Natural Resources Wales (NRW), this EA bylaw cannot be enforced on the Welsh reaches of the Severn, nor its tributaries. Further, despite the stock assessment for 2018 showing every salmon river in Wales to be "at risk, or probably at risk, of failing to meet its conservation limits," NRW remain unable to extend the enforcement of compulsory catch and release of salmon to all Welsh rivers.[1] Solely the result of political feet dragging.­­

NRW have previously conducted three comprehensive regional consultations on proposed changes to rod and net bylaws with regard to salmon and sea trout in Wales. The first and most extensive, in terms of geographical coverage, concerned every river in Wales but for the Dee, Wye and Severn. Two further, more specific, consultations then followed. One concerning the Dee and the Wye, both of which rise in Wales but bless England with their presence for part of their journey to the sea, and another for the Severn, which while it rises in Wales, flows for the greater part of its length through England.

By reciprocal arrangement the regulations relating to the exploitation of the salmon populations of the Dee and the Wye are governed by NRW, while management of the Severn salmon stocks falls to the EA.

With salmon stock assessments in Wales showing a continued decline, NRW contends it is imperative to implement a policy of compulsory catch and release on all Welsh waters to protect remaining salmon populations from further exploitation. As a result of the NRW consultations, bylaws were proposed placing restrictions on method, such as banning the use of treble hooks and all forms of bait. Further restrictions to those stipulated in the current bylaws relating to sewin (sea trout) were also put forward for consultation.

2018 Salmon Stock Assessment: http://bit.ly/2wtMlrK

In early 2018 these bylaw proposals were endorsed by the board of NRW and submitted to Welsh Government for confirmation. Six months later, in the autumn of 2018, in a wholly unexpected turn of events, Lesley Griffiths, the then Cabinet Secretary for Energy, Planning and Rural Affairs and more recently Minister for the Environment, Energy and Rural Affairs announced her conclusion that given “the level of response to the consultation, the number of outstanding objections to the byelaw proposals and the nature of the correspondence” it is “the most appropriate course of action to conduct a local Inquiry which will allow independent scrutiny of NRW’s proposals.”[2]

Richard Garner Williams commented:

“Proposals to protect salmon stocks in Wales have been put on hold while a protracted enquiry runs its course. The Inspector has now delivered his report but we remain none the wiser about the future intentions of the Welsh Government towards regulating the exploitation of a rapidly declining species. Meanwhile NRW have published their stock assessment for 2018 showing every salmon river in Wales to be at risk, or probably at risk, of failing to meet its conservation limits. Time is not a luxury we have in the fight to save wild Welsh Atlantic salmon for future generations.”

  1. Compulsory catch and release of salmon is already force on the Wye, Taff and Rhymni under the demands of an existing bylaw.
  2. https://naturalresourceswales.gov.uk/guidance-and-advice/business-sectors/fisheries/local-inquiry-into-nrw-s-proposals-for-new-rod-and-net-fishing-byelaws/?lang=en

For more information please contact: wales@salmon-trout.org

 

ARTIFISHAL & Patagonia Inc

"The thing that has struck us at the screenings we have attended is that the audience is far from being just anglers – it has been great seeing so many younger folk there and hearing their reaction to the issues"

Paul Knight, CEO Salmon & Trout Conservation

In 2019 one of Patagonia's core global campaigns has been highlighting the need for the protection of wild salmon populations around the world from the damaging impacts of commercial hatcheries and open cage salmon farming.

The campaign has centred around a feature length film "Artifishal"  which has been supported by a large public relations effort.

Patagonia Inc said: 

"Artifishal is a film about people, rivers, and the fight for the future of wild fish and the environment that supports them. It explores wild salmon’s slide toward extinction, threats posed by fish hatcheries and fish farms, and our continued loss of faith in nature."

The film has been toured around major European capitals and is now being shown by local activist groups in smaller towns and villages.

Accompanying the film has been a petition which is to be delivered to the governments of Scotland, Norway, Ireland and Iceland later in the year.

https://you.wemove.eu/campaigns/stop-europe-s-dirty-fish-farms

Salmon & Trout Conservation has supported the campaign throughout and participated as the lead NGO in the UK. Each film screening is book-ended with a hosted panel discussion of experts and a Q&A with the audience. S&TC staffers, Paul, Nick, Andrew and Corin have attended dozens of events between them throughout the UK and Europe. Largely speaking to issues around the impacts of open cage salmon farming in Scotland, but often ranging into areas of consumer activism, protecting wild waters and the process of forcing change from reluctant governments.

The audience members at screenings reflect Patagonia's demographic and have been overwhelmingly younger, environmentally active, consumer conscious and non fishing. The discussions, engagement and vocal consensus about the concerns being raised demonstrate that S&TC's campaigns do have very broad appeal and resonate strongly with consumers. This tells us a lot about how to build public support for the issues we are concerned with. Patagonia's global reach (over 1.5m followers on facebook and instagram) combined with their deeply held convictions on protecting wild places, activism and making change, has taken S&TC's message to people and places we would have struggled to reach ourselves, and at a scale that is internationally significant.

S&TC's credibility on the issues combined with Patagonia's credibility with consumers is proving to be a potent symbiotic relationship.

Corin Smith, Communications Consultant for S&TC said:

"Working with Patagonia Inc has been a significant coup for S&TC. Our highly visible collaboration to end open cage salmon farming has both government and industry deeply concerned. Touring with "Artifishal" has taught us a huge amount. Not least it has clearly demonstrated that our wider environmental attitude to campaigning, highlighted through consumer issues, has the potential for broad public appeal and engagement over the longterm."

Artifishal (Europe) By Numbers (up to June 2019)

Nearly 140,000 signatures! https://you.wemove.eu/campaigns/stop-europe-s-dirty-fish-farms

12 million -- Total reach for all film and campaign related content on social media through Patagonia sponsored ads

192 -- Number of PR pieces so far

> 197.5 million -- Total PR readership for these pieces

Meanwhile…

Salmon & Trout Conservation Scotland have secured a date to deliver the "Stop Europe's dirty fish farms" petition to the Scottish Government with Patagonia Inc

Patagonia's short film about salmon farming in Iceland went online: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vgmpdwOgvs

Media highlights

'We're the bad guy': inside the shocking new film about wild fish (The Guardian – review of the film at the Tribeca film festival).

Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard: ‘Denying climate change is evil’ (The Guardian – interview also features the film Artifishal)

Outdoor gear, food retailer Patagonia harshly criticizes aquaculture, hatcheries in "Artifishal" (SeafoodSource – great interview with Artifishal producer Dylan Tomine)

Salmon Farming Exposed – BBC Panorama program on salmon farming in Scotland and subsequent articles like this one. Some of the best recent coverage of the issue and features Corin Smith from Salmon & Trout Conservation Scotland.

We still have a few more months of "Artifishal" to go with a number of screenings in Scotland and the UK between now and September.

For dates near you check out: https://eu.patagonia.com/eu/artifishal-screenings.html

Thanks to Becky, Lisa Rose, Lisa D, Mihela and the rest of the team at Patagonia Inc. And of course Yvon, his vision, passion and conviction are game changing.

We continue!!!

NASCO 2019

“With S&TC’s Chairman, CEO, Head of Science and Scottish Director actively involved in NASCO, we are playing a genuinely influential role within international wild Atlantic salmon conservation politics”

The 2019 NASCO meeting was held in Tromsø, Norway, this year and was preceded by a 2-day Symposium for the International Year of the Salmon - Managing the Atlantic salmon in a rapidly changing environment.

S&TC’s Head of Science, Dr Janina Gray, gave a presentation on behalf of the NGOs, covering the importance of using science to support policy making in restoring Atlantic salmon stocks for conservation, cultural, food and recreation purposes.  The presentation was very well received by the 160 delegates and Janina’s main call to action was a challenge to the NASCO governments to politically commit the necessary policies and resources to protect and restore salmon stocks right across their North Atlantic range.

Perhaps the three most important recommendations coming out from the Symposium were that:

  1. The primary objective of salmon management across all NASCO Parties and Jurisdictions must be to produce the highest number of healthy wild salmon smolts possible from all relevant river systems;
  2. We have to change our mindset from purely managing wild salmon stocks to actively conserving them, otherwise extinctions will surely follow;
  3. Wild salmon do not recognise country boundaries and we have to think in terms of protecting the species on a global scale.  For example, fish heading from Spain, Portugal, France, Ireland and the UK, and from USA and Canada, all run the risk of being impacted by open-net salmon farming in other jurisdictions.  NASCO is ideally placed to reach a consensus as to how salmon farming should be operated and regulated to protect salmon across their entire range.

At a Special Session during the actual NASCO meeting, S&TC CEO, Paul Knight, who co-chairs the NGOs, gave a statement urging the Parties and Jurisdictions to undertake a progressive transition from a largely stock management to a protection/conservation regime for wild salmon.

His clear message was that we must aim for full wild smolt production by actioning measures to combat the stressors over which we have potential control – open-net salmon farming, water quality and quantity, intensive agriculture, hydroelectricity, barriers to migration, predation etc.

This will give salmon the best possible chance of surviving their marine phase, where there is far less that we can do to conserve them, except minimise coastal and high seas exploitation and by-catch.

In the questions that accompanied the Special Session, S&TC Chairman, Bill Hicks, received assurance that the annual process whereby NASCO jurisdictions report progress on their salmon management and conservation measures, would be more challenging to governments in future.  This will include NASCO representatives having to defend their actions publicly against questioning from the NGOs, which will enable us to better hold our respective governments to account over wild salmon conservation.

S&TC Scottish Director, Andrew Graham-Stewart, also gave a statement, in which he highlighted the continuing lack of commitment by those NASCO jurisdictions with open-net salmon farming to take the necessary and urgent measures, in line with the clear NASCO guidelines, to address the negative impacts of salmon farming on wild stocks.

His statement elicited several responses from the parties including a commitment from the senior Scottish Government representative who gave an assurance that a significant tightening of regulation of salmon farms is imminent.  This was consistent with the statement delivered to the Scottish Parliament on June 5 by Cabinet Secretary for the Rural Economy, Fergus Ewing, outlining the first steps towards delivering the recommendations from the Parliamentary Committee Inquiries last year, both of which reported that the status quo was no longer an option for the way in which salmon farming is operated or regulated in Scotland.

As well as the NGO statement, the NASCO Council was presented with a list of recommendations from the Symposium.  NASCO President, Jóannes Hansen from the Faroe Islands, confirmed that the Heads of Delegation would discuss the way forward for the forum in the autumn, and that the NGOs would be involved in discussing how NASCO would operate in the future.

So, at the end of an unusually upbeat NASCO meeting, there is the promise of beneficial change for wild salmon conservation across the North Atlantic.  And with S&TC’s Chairman, CEO, Head of Science and Scottish Director actively involved in NASCO, we are playing a genuinely influential role within international wild Atlantic salmon conservation politics, besides all that we do to restore wild stocks within UK river systems.

The RiverFly Census presents the conclusions and policy recommendations from three years of unprecedented species-level research and analysis across 12 rivers from southern chalk streams to the north’s Eden and Coquet.

The scope of the analysis is staggering: we (or rather, our independent scientist, Dr Nick Everall and his team) have sampled 34,000 river-dwelling invertebrates from more than 480 different species. This massive data set of aquatic “wee beasties” has provided hard evidence on the decline of riverfly life and tells a story of the pollution stresses our rivers face. By the Environment Agency’s own reckoning, only 14 % of our rivers are healthy and we reckon it is worse than that.

FURTHER ENQUIRIES

Corin Smith | Comms

comms@salmon-trout.org (+44 7463576892)

Troubling news from Wales

Troubling news from Wales as the recently published 2018 assessments of salmon and sea trout populations point towards a continued decline.

Stocks in twelve of the twenty-three principle salmon rivers were deemed to be “at risk” of failing to reach their conservation limits for sustainable recruitment and those in the remaining eleven rivers to be “probably at risk”.

Sewin stocks were found to be in an equally worrying situation with populations in sixteen of the thirty-three principle rivers revealed to be “at risk” and all but two of the remainder “probably at risk”. The need for urgent action to halt these declines grows by the day, not least in remedying the deterioration in water quality of several rivers brought about by intensive agriculture.

We eagerly await an announcement from Lesley Griffiths, Minister for Environment, Energy and Rural Affairs, on the details of the new regulations to tackle agricultural pollution to be implemented in January 2020 in the hope that they will be sufficiently robust to bring an end to the current unacceptable practices of a small number of irresponsible operators. While they will not be sufficient in themselves to bring about a complete recovery of stocks, they will nevertheless be warmly welcomed as an important first step in addressing the plight of our precious sewin and salmon.

 

Unlike Scotland and England, where the potential impact of everyday farming practices on water are regulated under a suite of legally enforced rules and measures, farmers in Wales have until recently only been expected to follow the voluntary Code of Good Agricultural Practice (CoGAP). There is a lot to be said for minimising regulatory control and respecting an individual’s right to use their own land as they please; but with rights come responsibilities which, when shouldered in a conscientious manner, naturally result in equitable outcomes. Sadly, that has not been the case with CoGAP and in recent years we have seen a startling increase in incidents of agricultural pollution, particularly so within the dairy sector, as producers have expanded their herds and effectively abandoned all notion of voluntary restraint in the spreading of slurry.

For more information please contact: wales@salmon-trout.org

2018 Sea Trout Stock Assessment: http://bit.ly/2XapNIa

2018 Salmon Stock Assessment: http://bit.ly/2wtMlrK

Header Image Credit: Steffan Jones

Profits And Pollution

"S&TC has for a long time questioned the English water companies over their abstraction policies, especially in water-scarce, aquifer-fed regions, but now it appears that other sectors of the industry are under scrutiny."

Paul Knight, CEO Salmon & Trout Conservation writes…..

Carry out the basic duties

In the Financial Times recently, it was reported that Southern Water Services is being investigated by the regulator, Ofwat, over allegations that it breached its statutory duties on sewage treatment.

In fact, this investigation had already been the subject of earlier FOI requests submitted by S&TC in 2018. Our investigation had required a referral to the Information Commissioner before OFWAT signalled last December that they were still investigating SWS and had been since June 2017.

OFWAT confirmed to S&TC that their investigation covered “the company’s general duty to, among other things, provide and maintain its sewerage system to ensure its area is effectually drained (Section 94 Water Industry Act 1991) and the company’s obligation to ensure it has adequate financial and management resources and systems of planning and control in place to enable it to fulfil its statutory obligations (Condition F of its licence)”.

The investigation, which covers wastewater treatment works operated by SWS, is also looking at the company’s reporting of relevant compliance information to OFWAT, focused on the years from 2010 to 2017. OFWAT is looking at whether SWS needs to make future revenue adjustments and/or pay penalties.

In short, this is all about SWS’s basic duty, to operate sewers, collect sewage and treat sewage to render it harmless. If it has failed to do this properly, in  some systematic way,  it would be shocking.

We now see that the allegations are so strong that the Serious Fraud Office could become involved.

Overwhelming Overflows

S&TC’s Riverfly Census results are showing just what a dreadful ecological state some of our rivers are in at the moment, and impact from inadequately-treated sewage is undoubtedly one of the sources of the offending pollution, together with the lack of dilution for pollutants due to excessive water abstraction.  This is especially the case in some smaller, rural treatment works, where investment has not been as great as in larger urban areas. Many of these rural units cannot cope with being inundated in storm-water events and have no option but to spill raw sewage into rivers.  Our wild fish stocks inevitably suffer in such events, as does their food chain and the whole ecology of our river systems.

While water companies must be commended for the huge investment that has been made to clean up the environment since privatisation in 1989, to enable that to happen, they have accumulated some £51bn of debt, while a staggering £56bn has been paid out to shareholders in dividends - according to an analysis of Ofwat’s accounts by the Financial Times. In contrast, we note that Dwr Cymru (Welsh Water) is a not for profit company.

Profit should not be made off the back of pollution

SWS is owned by a consortium of private equity and infrastructure investors, including, amongst others, UBS Asset Management and JPMorgan Asset Management.  Between 2016 and 2017, SWS distributed no less than £190m in shareholder dividends while its treatment works continued to discharge under-treated sewage into the environment. We have to ask whether investors such as UBS and JP Morgan will ever have the best interests of our water environment as a priority, over making a return on capital?  The investigation  by Ofwat, and the possibility of the involvement of the Serious Fraud Office, suggests that those of us trying to protect our rivers, coasts and their dependent wild stocks of fish, should be very concerned indeed.

At S&TC, we now have the evidence within our Riverfly Census Report to put in front of decision makers to demand that they regulate water polluters with a great deal more zeal than they have done in the past.  In terms of water companies, that means that Ofwat must go further than merely ensuring customers pay the minimum possible for their water supplies and sewage treatment – there has to be a genuine responsibility for environmental protection. The better news is that we hear rumours of the Environment Agency getting tougher with water companies but, again, they need the resources to operate effectively.

The Riverfly Census: Launch

“If you do nothing else this month, read the Riverfly Census report which got its first airing at a mid-May reception in London.”

Nick Mesham, Deputy CEO, Salmon & Trout Conservation

To download the full report: CLICK HERE 

Once upon a time, industry was poisoning the nation’s life-blood rivers, but the story nowadays is all about more subtle but equally lethal threats.

The RiverFly Census presents the conclusions and policy recommendations from three years of unprecedented species-level research and analysis across 12 rivers from southern chalk streams to the north’s Eden and Coquet.

The scope of the analysis is staggering: we (or rather, our independent scientist, Dr Nick Everall and his team) have sampled 34,000 river-dwelling invertebrates from more than 480 different species. This massive data set of aquatic “wee beasties” has provided hard evidence on the decline of riverfly life and tells a story of the pollution stresses our rivers face. By the Environment Agency’s own reckoning, only 14 % of our rivers are healthy and we reckon it is worse than that.

Next steps: SmartRivers 

We will be using the results from the Census to campaign for action to restore our rivers, but our work will not stop there. We need much more evidence from other rivers to maximise our impact, but we cannot do this alone.

We are calling on volunteers to extend the Riverfly Census’s probing health check to as many rivers in the UK as we can with our SmartRivers initiative (https://www.salmon-trout.org/smart-rivers/.

We have the funding to help you make this happen.

If you are up to the challenge, contact us at smartrivers@salmon-trout.org or on 01425 652461

Reporting with a purpose

S&TC are a national organisation and we use evidence from local case studies to help instigate policy changes that will benefit UK wild fish populations. But, this is just part of the value - we are making all our Riverfly Census findings available so they can be used to inform local management and drive action.

Each individual river report is based on three years of surveying data. Where possible, we have linked up our findings with other existing literature and data. Using the available information we suggest where local fishing and/or conservation groups can focus their management efforts to achieve the best health outcomes for each of the 12 original Census rivers.

Some of our local reports can be found on the slider below. Alternatively, visit the Riverfly Census page and scroll down to the map.

We all have a responsibility to save the ‘King of Fish’

The publication of new Environment Agency byelaws banning the killing of salmon in the North East drift and coastal nets was very welcome news earlier this year and brought to a close a campaign by fisheries organisations that lasted some 30 years.

Scotland banned drift netting in 1962 and closed down its coastal nets in 2016, so most UK salmon are now able to reach their rivers of birth unhindered by home-water netting. It was a tremendous way to begin the International Year of the Salmon. However, the same is not true of salmon feeding off the West Coast of Greenland, an area where many of the UK’s multi-sea-winter fish go to fatten up. 

Getting the quotas right

The North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organisation (NASCO) was originally established more than 30 years ago to set quotas for Greenland and the Faroe Islands, who between them caught nearly 4,000 tonnes of salmon at the height of their respective commercial fishing industries (Greenland in the mid 1970s and the Faroes early 1980s).  The Faroe Islands have not fished for salmon since 2000, although they reserve the right to do so if the International Council for the Exploration of the Seas (ICES) ever report again that there is enough of a surplus of fish in the North Atlantic to exploit.

Greenland is much more complicated. For many years, NASCO gave the Greenlanders a subsistence quota of around 20 tonnes of salmon – fish that could be caught and either sold in the local open-air markets or kept for food by the fishermen.  Commercial fishing was not allowed, and export was banned.  Private funds were even given from around the North Atlantic countries with recreational fishing to the Greenlanders to help them re-equip and target different species.

However, monitoring and enforcement of salmon fishing by the Greenland Government was only really tightened some five years ago, when it became clear that the actual salmon catch was veering towards 100 tonnes a year.  To be fair, it is a thankless task trying to oversee any coastal activity in Greenland, as the West Coast communities are so disparate – there is no road connection between them, with travel limited to those with access to either boat or plane.  However, when Government officials started to phone round the fishing community and ask for catch statistics, alarm bells were rung.

The current situation

In 2015, Greenland accepted a quota of 45 tonnes agreed at NASCO.  Unfortunately, some people with little knowledge of the background ridiculed NASCO for the size of the quota, when in realistic terms, it was actually halving the amount of fish that was now known to have been caught in previous years.  Coupled to the new quota was a new management and regulatory system adopted by the Greenland Government which put much greater emphasis on monitoring and reporting.  In 2018, the quota was reduced to 30 tonnes.

The bad news is that Greenland has just reported a catch of 40 tonnes for 2018!  However, rather than a return to the bad days, at least the government has a handle on the fishery now and, if it abides by the NASCO agreement, the 10-tonne excess will be taken off the quota for this season, which is comforting news for our MSW (Multi Sea Winter) fish.

What this means closer to home...

All this regulation and government support at Greenland and the Faroe Islands means that UK governments have an extra responsibility to protect salmon stocks at home.  Good for Scotland and England in taking decisive action over coastal netting, but we still have serious issues to address – open-net salmon farming, agricultural impact on water quality, habitat degradation, water abstraction, barriers to migration, predation – and for that we need a political commitment throughout the UK which is sadly lacking at the moment.

I have some sympathy for Greenlanders who generally have a far better grasp of what ‘sustainable exploitation’ means than we ever have – they still derive much of their protein from natural resources and realise how important it is to manage those stocks effectively.  So when an angler lands a salmon in the UK and has to return it to the water because of byelaws or fishery rules, rather than curse the regulators, spare a thought for the Greenlanders and Faroese and their sacrifice in the name of conservation.

Better still, understand that, as Sir David Attenborough said in our recent video, if we are not to lose the King of Fish for ever, we all have to play our part, in whatever way we can, to help Atlantic salmon through their present crisis. The International Year of the Salmon gives us the opportunity to focus on that very stark warning, and act now!

- Paul Knight, CEO

International Year of the Salmon – Our annual seminar in Wales

Latest figures reveal populations in 21 of the country’s 23 principle salmon rivers to be probably at risk or at risk of failing to meet their conservation limits. It was with this thought in mind that the recent S&TC Cymru annual seminar took on an International Year of the Salmon theme, posing the question: “Can we save the Atlantic salmon?”

The overall consensus

Robust presentations citing the latest discoveries in our understanding of salmon population dynamics left delegates in no doubt that a new approach towards habitat management and water quality management is required if we are to maximise spawning success and achieve maximum escapement. Learn more about how S&TC are fighting for healthy habitats here.

Central to achieving good water quality is a science-backed understanding of what the pressures are. Our Riverfly Census provides critical insights into the health of the freshwater environment, but also provides benchmarks against which to assess the success or otherwise of various management interventions.

It is imperative that the Riverfly Census work is continued through its future development and expansion into S&TC’s SmartRivers; where local people will be able to harness the power of species-level invertebrate analysis to pinpoint water quality pressures on their own rivers.

Summary of the day

Proceedings began with a passionate personal account by author and broadcaster Will Millard of the important role salmon, clean rivers and wild fish have played in his life and his desire to see them restored and protected. Our CEO Paul Knight explained the important and role S&TC has played over the past century advocating on behalf of salmon while deputy CEO Nick Measham revealed the manner in which our Riverfly Census can be used to highlight the threats facing the invertebrate population upon which salmon parr depend.

Dr Nigel Milner related the role played by the IFM at NASCO and the need to revise current stock assessment methods to better understand and predict the dynamics of salmon populations. Ian Davidson of NRW continued the stock assessment theme and the
important role played by the Welsh Dee or Dyfrdwy as an index river. The dynamics and fate of small and declining salmon populations were presented by Professor Carlos Garcia de Leaniz of Swansea University who also drew attention to the hitherto underestimated importance of salmon choosing to spawn in different rivers to those in which they originated. The morning session was drawn to a close by author and Gamefisher editor Tom Fort who narrated a fascinating thousand year history of salmon exploitation in British rivers by both nets and rods.

The afternoon session got under way with a comprehensive and encouraging report from Dŵr Cymru Welsh Water’s Environment Programme Manager, Gail Davies, on the company’s
contributions towards conserving the freshwater environment and safeguarding the future of our wild fish. Dr Guy Mawle gave a detailed and valuable account of his own thoughts and observations, posing some challenging questions regarding possible reasons for recent declines in reported salmon numbers from his home river, the Usk. Drawing the theme of the day to a close, Dr Stephen Marsh-Smith OBE of Afonydd Cymru and the Wye and Usk Foundation related his own conclusions drawn from a long and intimate connection with the Wye and offered some valuable suggestions on the steps required if we are to see our salmon stocks return to truly sustainable levels.

Our Fundraising Manager, Guy Edwards, then gave a short but powerful presentation on the value of our financial independence and the need to allow science to lead us in our campaigning efforts. This was followed by S&TC trustee Tony Bostock who provided a very useful summary of the day’s proceedings before thanking the contributors for their valuable contributions.

Seminar coordinator and S&TC’s National Officer for Wales, Richard Garner Williams, wishes to thank all concerned for making the day such a success and looks forward to repeating the exercise in 2020.

Header image credit: Alan Ward at country field media.

For Welsh enquiries contact: wales@salmon-trout.org

For Riverfly Census enquiries contact: lauren@salmon-trout.org

Local myth-busting with the Riverfly Census Conclusions

You’ve probably seen our local Riverfly Census Conclusion reports popping up over the past few weeks. Now we’re tying up the Riverfly Census project, we thought it would be useful to let you know what these reports mean, how they can be used and the exciting things planned as we draw closer to the big Riverfly Census finale in May!

 

A bit of Riverfly Census background

At S&TC we were determined to grasp a true biological picture of our rivers, because detailed, robust baselines of their health are missing.

Without a strong data baseline it is difficult to pinpoint exact pressures or confidently measure improvement. A doctor could not assess your health without scans, tests or a family history - our rivers are no different! Cue the launch of the Riverfly Census, a national research project developed to assess and diagnose the health of a variety of UK rivers.

Aquatic invertebrates were our ‘scan’ of choice because:



They represent a long-term picture, much more informative than a single point water sample, as in nymph form they are exposed to the water sometimes for years.



They are excellent story tellers as every invertebrate species thrives in a specific set of conditions. The types of bugs present and absent from a sample indicate what pressures a river may be experiencing.

Reporting with a purpose

S&TC are a national organisation and we use evidence from local case studies to help instigate policy changes that will benefit UK wild fish populations. But, this is just part of the value- we are making all our Riverfly Census findings available so they can be used to inform local management and drive action.

Each individual river report is based on three years of surveying data. Where possible, we have linked up our findings with other existing literature and data. Using the available information we suggest where local fishing and/or conservation groups can focus their management efforts to achieve the best health outcomes for each of the 12 original Census rivers.

Some of our local reports can be found on the slider below. Alternatively, visit the Riverfly Census page and scroll down to the map.

What's next?

There are still a few local reports to be completed, but our main focus at the moment has been putting together the national Riverfly Census conclusions; an overarching document with evidence based recommendations from our data.

The most powerful aspect of our Riverfly Census was that all the data was collected and analysed independently by professionals. Because of this, the Census is not just more science for the sake of science, it is usable data that can be used to shape environmental policy.

Wild salmon and trout need the best water quality possible to thrive, and if we can get decision makers to take on some of our recommendations, we believe we will get one step closer to achieving the environment they need.

 

The national Riverfly Census report will be launched on the 14th May 2019, so keep an eye on our social channels or sign up to our mailing list to stay in the know.

 

Header image credit: Don Stazicker

For Riverfly Census enquiries contact: lauren@salmon-trout.org

Prix Charles Ritz Award 2019 celebrates river conservation in England and Wales

The International Fario Club, with assistance from Salmon & Trout Conservation, have this year launched the Prix Charles Ritz award for England and Wales, to honour projects here helping to preserve our rivers for future generations.

Recognising environmental initiatives on the rivers we cherish

This year the Prix Charles Ritz is launching an award in England and Wales for
individuals/communities who make a difference to the rivers they cherish. A monetary
donation will be awarded to individuals or communities who, through their project(s) in
England or Wales, exhibit the utmost devotion and commitment to the environment.

Specifically, the award is granted to initiatives carried out for the preservation of our
freshwater environment. The Prix Charles Ritz celebrate and rewards those who take care of
our rivers and ecosystems, and champions work to develop and improve rivers.

Rivers are influenced by human activity, both upstream and downstream. However what goes on beneath the surface is mostly hidden from sight and unknown, with water often appearing much healthier than it really is. The issues impacting rivers are numerous, and fish sadly do not receive the same public conservation attention as more ‘cuddly’ mammals; yet the plight of our freshwater habitats has never been more deserving of attention, and their ecosystem and wildlife never in greater need of our protection.

The aim of the award is therefore to cherish the rivers to which we all belong, which was an important legacy of the late and great Charles Ritz, after whom the award is named.

In memory of international river advocate, Charles Ritz

Few people have contributed as much to the evolution of fly fishing and environmental awareness as Charles César Ritz, born in 1891. French born, Charles emigrated to the United States in 1916, where he mastered the art of fly-fishing and became one of the foremost specialists on the subject, eventually inventing the famous parabolic fly-rod.

Author of the internationally treasured ‘Pris sur le Vif’ (‘A Fly Fishers Life’), Charles César Ritz was a pioneer in ecology, a defender of river quality, and a passionate, well travelled, fly fisher; his skills famously endorsed by Ernest Hemingway. His favourite rivers included the Test, Avon, and Itchen in Southern England, where he helped to popularise catch and release.

In 1958, Charles Ritz created the International Fario Club to keep an eye on river quality & ecosystem health. The club brought together five continents with a shared passion for fly fishing and conservation.

Passing away in 1976, at the age of eighty-five, Charles left a genuine legacy in both conservation and fly fishing. Today, his beloved Fario Club continue to promote river health and further his conservation efforts through the aptly named Charles Ritz award. By highlighting and rewarding the improvement and restoration of aquatic environments, the incredible work of this ecological pioneer lives on, and our freshwater ecosystems remain an urgent environmental priority amid increasing pressures.

Applications

The award is aimed at restoration projects, large or small, and/or community projects with the core objective of improving the river environment and the species which depend upon them. This may be achieved through direct action or education, or a mixture of both.

Judges will be looking for a solid rationale and evidence of river improvements; as such applicants will need to submit photographic evidence of their works and a detailed explanation of both the objectives and the results. A range of resources could be used to highlight the impact of the work, for example media coverage, monitoring results, before and after pictures and any relevant documents which demonstrate the scope and success of the work.

How to apply

All applications with projects undertaken in England and Wales are accepted. Applicants can download an application form here. The application form must be returned by 31st August 2019  to prixcharlesritz@gmail.com

The judging panel will compile a short list of 3 applicants and visit these projects over the summer. The winner will be notified in late November, and an awards ceremony held in the beginning of 2020.

For more info please visit: http://www.prixcharlesritz.org/?lang=en

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Terms and Conditions

Prix Charles Ritz will use the material from any entry or prize winner in its promotional literature, or on its website, or in other publicity as may be appropriate, unless you advise at the time of entry that you do not wish to take part. Copyright in any and all material submitted by the applicant(s) will remain with the applicant(s), although by submitting an entry, the applicant agrees to the organisation using material as described in these terms.

Prize winners agree to attend the Awards Ceremony and presentation.

By entering the Conservation Awards you are providing your information to Prix Charles Ritz and no other party. The information you provide will be used in conjunction with the Prix Charles Ritz privacy policy, which should be read in addition to these terms and conditions.