ARTIFISHAL & Patagonia Inc

"The thing that has struck us at the screenings we have attended is that the audience is far from being just anglers – it has been great seeing so many younger folk there and hearing their reaction to the issues"

Paul Knight, CEO Salmon & Trout Conservation

In 2019 one of Patagonia's core global campaigns has been highlighting the need for the protection of wild salmon populations around the world from the damaging impacts of commercial hatcheries and open cage salmon farming.

The campaign has centred around a feature length film "Artifishal"  which has been supported by a large public relations effort.

Patagonia Inc said: 

"Artifishal is a film about people, rivers, and the fight for the future of wild fish and the environment that supports them. It explores wild salmon’s slide toward extinction, threats posed by fish hatcheries and fish farms, and our continued loss of faith in nature."

The film has been toured around major European capitals and is now being shown by local activist groups in smaller towns and villages.

Accompanying the film has been a petition which is to be delivered to the governments of Scotland, Norway, Ireland and Iceland later in the year.

https://you.wemove.eu/campaigns/stop-europe-s-dirty-fish-farms

Salmon & Trout Conservation has supported the campaign throughout and participated as the lead NGO in the UK. Each film screening is book-ended with a hosted panel discussion of experts and a Q&A with the audience. S&TC staffers, Paul, Nick, Andrew and Corin have attended dozens of events between them throughout the UK and Europe. Largely speaking to issues around the impacts of open cage salmon farming in Scotland, but often ranging into areas of consumer activism, protecting wild waters and the process of forcing change from reluctant governments.

The audience members at screenings reflect Patagonia's demographic and have been overwhelmingly younger, environmentally active, consumer conscious and non fishing. The discussions, engagement and vocal consensus about the concerns being raised demonstrate that S&TC's campaigns do have very broad appeal and resonate strongly with consumers. This tells us a lot about how to build public support for the issues we are concerned with. Patagonia's global reach (over 1.5m followers on facebook and instagram) combined with their deeply held convictions on protecting wild places, activism and making change, has taken S&TC's message to people and places we would have struggled to reach ourselves, and at a scale that is internationally significant.

S&TC's credibility on the issues combined with Patagonia's credibility with consumers is proving to be a potent symbiotic relationship.

Corin Smith, Communications Consultant for S&TC said:

"Working with Patagonia Inc has been a significant coup for S&TC. Our highly visible collaboration to end open cage salmon farming has both government and industry deeply concerned. Touring with "Artifishal" has taught us a huge amount. Not least it has clearly demonstrated that our wider environmental attitude to campaigning, highlighted through consumer issues, has the potential for broad public appeal and engagement over the longterm."

Artifishal (Europe) By Numbers (up to June 2019)

Nearly 140,000 signatures! https://you.wemove.eu/campaigns/stop-europe-s-dirty-fish-farms

12 million -- Total reach for all film and campaign related content on social media through Patagonia sponsored ads

192 -- Number of PR pieces so far

> 197.5 million -- Total PR readership for these pieces

Meanwhile…

Salmon & Trout Conservation Scotland have secured a date to deliver the "Stop Europe's dirty fish farms" petition to the Scottish Government with Patagonia Inc

Patagonia's short film about salmon farming in Iceland went online: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vgmpdwOgvs

Media highlights

'We're the bad guy': inside the shocking new film about wild fish (The Guardian – review of the film at the Tribeca film festival).

Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard: ‘Denying climate change is evil’ (The Guardian – interview also features the film Artifishal)

Outdoor gear, food retailer Patagonia harshly criticizes aquaculture, hatcheries in "Artifishal" (SeafoodSource – great interview with Artifishal producer Dylan Tomine)

Salmon Farming Exposed – BBC Panorama program on salmon farming in Scotland and subsequent articles like this one. Some of the best recent coverage of the issue and features Corin Smith from Salmon & Trout Conservation Scotland.

We still have a few more months of "Artifishal" to go with a number of screenings in Scotland and the UK between now and September.

For dates near you check out: https://eu.patagonia.com/eu/artifishal-screenings.html

Thanks to Becky, Lisa Rose, Lisa D, Mihela and the rest of the team at Patagonia Inc. And of course Yvon, his vision, passion and conviction are game changing.

We continue!!!

Anne Voss-Bark Memorial Award 2019

In its fifth year, the Anne Voss-Bark Memorial Award 2019 is now open to students.

See below for details on this exciting award, and please share with any suitable students you may know.

What is the Anne Voss-Bark Memorial Award?

Set up by Salmon & Trout Conservation in collaboration with the Arundel Arms and Fario Club, the Anne Voss-Bark Memorial Award 2019 offers students:

  • One week work experience with the West Country Rivers Trust; learning catchment management and water science from the Trusts eminent scientists
  • Two day fly fishing course
  • Complimentary stay at the Arundell Arms hotel during the work experience
  • £250

The work experience for the winning student will be organised for this autumn.

Who is the Anne Voss-Bark Award open to?

The award is open to young fisheries or aquatic students and offers an unbeatable opportunity to study the practical elements of river restoration and management.

What does a previous winner say?

William Davison, winner of the 2018 award, and who is currently undertaking a PhD at the University of Exeter researching ‘using physiology to improve the sustainability of fish production in aquaculture’, said:

“Winning the Anne Voss Bark award was such a great and rewarding experience. Having grown up around the UK’s waterways I’ve always loved them but the opportunity to work with the West Country Rivers Trust for a week really gave me a deeper understanding of what a healthy river actually means and the work involved in protecting them.

This award has also taught me a whole range of hugely valuable skills relating to the importance of outreach, stakeholder engagement and using a more holistic approach to conservation. Going forward I’m going to be able to carry these skills with me in my future PhD work related to promotion of sustainable aquaculture practices.”

Dr Janina Gray, Head of Science & Environmental Policy at S&TC, says,

“William is a perfect example of why this Award is such amazing opportunity for young fisheries and aquatic scientists to gain unbeatable insight into the world of water conservation, and putting theory into action”.

Who was Ann Voss-Bark?

Anne Voss-Bark was a dedicated conservationist and prominent hotelier. Her love of fly fishing made her aware of changes in the countryside detrimental to our rivers and fish. She worked tirelessly to see this demise reversed.

Anne was a strong supporter of the S&TC (then S&TA), the only UK fisheries campaigning charity. She was a Council Member, Vice Chairman and finally Vice President of the charity.

Anne, with others, also founded the West Country Rivers Trust, embracing the concept of total river management.

Anne will also always be well-remembered as the perfect hostess at the Arundell Arms in Lifton, Devon, which was rather run down on acquisition but developed by her over nearly 50 years into today’s eminent fishing and country sports hotel.

How can students apply for the Anne Voss-Bark Award 2019?

Wild fish and their habitats were of great importance to Anne, and we look for the same level of  passion in our applicants.

To apply, in no more than 500 words explain what this work experience opportunity means to you, why you should get this opportunity, and how it would benefit you.

Applicants will need to be available to undertake the placement between the 4th-11thOctober 2019.

The Closing date for applications is 31st July 2019.

To submit an entry or for further information on the Award, please contact Dr Janina Gray, Head of Science at S&TC by email on: janina@salmon-trout.org

Prix Charles Ritz Award 2019 celebrates river conservation in England and Wales

The International Fario Club, with assistance from Salmon & Trout Conservation, have this year launched the Prix Charles Ritz award for England and Wales, to honour projects here helping to preserve our rivers for future generations.

Recognising environmental initiatives on the rivers we cherish

This year the Prix Charles Ritz is launching an award in England and Wales for
individuals/communities who make a difference to the rivers they cherish. A monetary
donation will be awarded to individuals or communities who, through their project(s) in
England or Wales, exhibit the utmost devotion and commitment to the environment.

Specifically, the award is granted to initiatives carried out for the preservation of our
freshwater environment. The Prix Charles Ritz celebrate and rewards those who take care of
our rivers and ecosystems, and champions work to develop and improve rivers.

Rivers are influenced by human activity, both upstream and downstream. However what goes on beneath the surface is mostly hidden from sight and unknown, with water often appearing much healthier than it really is. The issues impacting rivers are numerous, and fish sadly do not receive the same public conservation attention as more ‘cuddly’ mammals; yet the plight of our freshwater habitats has never been more deserving of attention, and their ecosystem and wildlife never in greater need of our protection.

The aim of the award is therefore to cherish the rivers to which we all belong, which was an important legacy of the late and great Charles Ritz, after whom the award is named.

In memory of international river advocate, Charles Ritz

Few people have contributed as much to the evolution of fly fishing and environmental awareness as Charles César Ritz, born in 1891. French born, Charles emigrated to the United States in 1916, where he mastered the art of fly-fishing and became one of the foremost specialists on the subject, eventually inventing the famous parabolic fly-rod.

Author of the internationally treasured ‘Pris sur le Vif’ (‘A Fly Fishers Life’), Charles César Ritz was a pioneer in ecology, a defender of river quality, and a passionate, well travelled, fly fisher; his skills famously endorsed by Ernest Hemingway. His favourite rivers included the Test, Avon, and Itchen in Southern England, where he helped to popularise catch and release.

In 1958, Charles Ritz created the International Fario Club to keep an eye on river quality & ecosystem health. The club brought together five continents with a shared passion for fly fishing and conservation.

Passing away in 1976, at the age of eighty-five, Charles left a genuine legacy in both conservation and fly fishing. Today, his beloved Fario Club continue to promote river health and further his conservation efforts through the aptly named Charles Ritz award. By highlighting and rewarding the improvement and restoration of aquatic environments, the incredible work of this ecological pioneer lives on, and our freshwater ecosystems remain an urgent environmental priority amid increasing pressures.

Applications

The award is aimed at restoration projects, large or small, and/or community projects with the core objective of improving the river environment and the species which depend upon them. This may be achieved through direct action or education, or a mixture of both.

Judges will be looking for a solid rationale and evidence of river improvements; as such applicants will need to submit photographic evidence of their works and a detailed explanation of both the objectives and the results. A range of resources could be used to highlight the impact of the work, for example media coverage, monitoring results, before and after pictures and any relevant documents which demonstrate the scope and success of the work.

How to apply

All applications with projects undertaken in England and Wales are accepted. Applicants can download an application form here. The application form must be returned by 31st August 2019  to prixcharlesritz@gmail.com

The judging panel will compile a short list of 3 applicants and visit these projects over the summer. The winner will be notified in late November, and an awards ceremony held in the beginning of 2020.

For more info please visit: http://www.prixcharlesritz.org/?lang=en

Quick Links

Terms and Conditions

Prix Charles Ritz will use the material from any entry or prize winner in its promotional literature, or on its website, or in other publicity as may be appropriate, unless you advise at the time of entry that you do not wish to take part. Copyright in any and all material submitted by the applicant(s) will remain with the applicant(s), although by submitting an entry, the applicant agrees to the organisation using material as described in these terms.

Prize winners agree to attend the Awards Ceremony and presentation.

By entering the Conservation Awards you are providing your information to Prix Charles Ritz and no other party. The information you provide will be used in conjunction with the Prix Charles Ritz privacy policy, which should be read in addition to these terms and conditions. 

Running for wild fish: S&TC supporter takes on ultra marathon

Run Phil, Run

Avid fly fisherman, conservationist and S&TC supporter Phil Chessum will be running an ultra-marathon to raise funds for our hugely important work.

Phil has committed to running the 'Race to the Kings' on the 22nd and 23rd June - a double marathon along the breathtaking South Downs Way which culminates in a magnificent finish on the steps of Winchester Cathedral. You can find out more about the event here.

running for wild fish

We are incredibly proud and grateful that Phil has chosen our work to benefit from his "marathon" efforts! We would like to highlight Phil's sponsorship page and ask that all our members spread the word, and consider a donation to the fund.

You can support Phil and S&TC by making a donation on his Virgin Money page:

A special thank you goes to Phil. An ultra marathon is no mean feat, and we wish you all the best with your training and on race day!

Phil's sponsorship money will go directly towards conserving wild salmon and sea trout via our action on water quality and salmon farming.

If you are undertaking a special challenge or event, or would like more information on fundraising for us, please contact our Fundraising Manager, Guy Edwards on Guy@salmon-trout.org.

We gratefully welcome all support, whatever the size and scope- from ultra marathons to coffee mornings, from membership to one off donations, and much more.

The S&TC official Virgin Money page can be found here, should you wish to initiate your own event or fundraising idea.

S&TC ask Sir David Attenborough to talk Salmon for IYS

For International Year of the Salmon, we asked Sir David Attenborough for his views on the need to protect the species.

We say that to save wild salmon, Governments across the Northern Hemisphere need to act now.

The following video gives a very clear message about this, if we are not going to lose the ‘King of Fish’ for ever!

We will continue our current work on reforming unsustainable salmon farming in Scotland and improving water quality, both vital issues affecting the health of wild salmon populations.

However, the greater support we receive, the more influential we can be. Please support us as we continue our hard work.

You can also support us by sharing and engaging with this content far and wide on our various social channels:

375,000+ citizens tell the European Commission “Hands off our water law!”

375,386 people have called on the European Commission to defend Europe’s strong water law, making the EU’s public consultation on the legislation one of the largest ever in the history of the European Union.

This law is critical to ensure that Europe’s rivers, lakes and wetlands are protected and brought back to good health. As our Head of Science and Environmental Policy, Dr Janina Gray, explains:

"The Water Framework Directive gives a basic protection for our rivers and waterlife, and has resulted over the years in millions of pounds of investment, mainly from water companies.  Any weakening of the WFD standards would have catastrophic implications for our waterways and wild fish.

Over 375,000 people have spoken, sending a clear message that the WFD’ standards must remain as they are. This is of paramount importance in driving Government commitment to the protection of our rivers, streams and wild fish following Brexit."

Find out more: Protect Water

The NGO-led #ProtectWater campaign inspired citizens across Europe and beyond to take a stand for Europe’s rivers, lakes and wetlands, and the strong law which protects them, the EU Water Framework Directive, during the European Commission’s ongoing fitness-check.

“375,386 citizens have spoken up for Europe’s precious rivers, lakes and wetlands, and against their ongoing destruction. They have told their governments loud and clear not to undermine the EU water law - decision-makers must now listen up and take these voices seriously”

said Ester Asin, Director of WWF’s European Policy Office,

“With 60% of Europe’s waters in a critical state, the need for action from Member States is urgent. They were meant to put a stop to this destruction when they signed up to the Water Framework Directive in 2000, but, instead, have spent the best part of two decades brazenly side-stepping their commitments and not implementing it. We urge them to own up to their inaction today and, instead of pushing for this law to be changed, take citizens' views on board.”

The #ProtectWater campaign was led by WWF, the European Environmental Bureau, the European Anglers Alliance, the European Rivers Network and Wetlands International - who together form the Living Rivers Europe Coalition.

It facilitated citizens’ participation in the European Commission’s public consultation on the Water Framework Directive (the only opportunity for the general public to have its say during the EU fitness-check) to express their clear opposition to changing the legislation. It was launched in October 2018 and went on to be supported by more than 130 civil society organisations, including national partners and offices of Greenpeace, BirdLife and Friends of the Earth, as well as unions.

The EU’s official analysis of the public consultation, which closed on 11 March, is likely to be published in the autumn of 2019, with the final decision on the future of the legislation expected by the first half of 2020.

As Living Rivers Europe, we will be there every step of the way to ensure that the Water Framework Directive remains intact, and will continue to push for this visionary legislation to be fully implemented by Member States and enforced by the European Commission so that it that the vast majority of Europe’s waters are returned to good health by 2027 (at the absolute latest).

S&TC joins partners across the Northern Hemisphere to launch the International Year of the Salmon (IYS) 2019

S&TC joins partners across the Northern Hemisphere to launch the International Year of the Salmon (IYS) 2019

One of the more significant things on our 2019 radar is the International Year of the Salmon; an opportunity to further our important work, collaborate with other salmon conservationists and help spread the word about these beautiful creatures who are sadly struggling.

What is the International Year of the Salmon (IYS)?

IYS is a North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organization (NASCO) and North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission (NPAFC) initiative to support the conservation and restoration of wild salmon species. You can view the official IYS page here.

Salmon are at risk from environmental change and human activities across the Northern Hemisphere, but saving these beautiful and influential creatures requires a uniquely large-scale solution. The International Year of the Salmon sets out to protect salmon by bringing people together to share knowledge, raise public awareness and take action. We have a chance to save not just salmon, but also the communities and cultures that depend on them.

Why do Atlantic salmon need our help?

Wild Atlantic salmon are one of the world’s most iconic species, and a vital indicator of healthy aquatic environments. Their epic migration is one of nature’s greatest stories, swimming thousands of kilometres from home rivers to Northern Hemisphere oceans and back again. A rich cultural history has ensued, where people’s lives and ancestries have been shaped by their interactions with salmon.

Find out more about Atlantic salmon and their plight

However, Atlantic salmon are in a perilous state in their marine and freshwater environments. This is due to environmental change, as well as human activities. IYS will bring people together to share knowledge, stimulate investment in research, and raise public awareness to take appropriate action for salmon.  We have an opportunity to save not just salmon and their environments for future generations, but also the communities and cultures that depend on them.

How will IYS help wild salmon?

  • CONNECTION: The International Year of the Salmon brings together countries across the Northern Hemisphere, because no single country can hope to address fully the challenges that salmon face over their amazing migrations. In their epic migrations through rivers and oceans salmon know no borders; to help them we have to reach across borders and build bridges between countries and cultures.
  • KNOWLEDGE: The International Year of the Salmon will harness ongoing research and kick start partnerships and public action in Europe, North America and Asia to give salmon a better chance to survive and thrive. People across the Northern Hemisphere need to understand more about how migrating Atlantic salmon are unique, complex fish that are infinitely precious to those countries where they migrate, breed, give birth and die. Collaborating and sharing knowledge is essential to learn how best to help salmon.The International Year of the Salmon will draw on science, Indigenous knowledge, and the experience of fishers, policy makers, resource managers and others working to conserve and protect salmon.
  • ACTION: The negative effects that humans have on salmon are now at crucial levels – but it’s not too late. Anyone who cares about the survival of salmon can get involved in the International Year of the Salmon. Experts are needed – but it will take the passion and commitment of people from all walks of life to make the difference. Even the smallest contribution can help. Everyone has a role to play. Even if you've never seen salmon in the wild, the chances are they play a vital role in ecosystems essential to you. The International Year of the Salmon is your chance to join people across the world to make a difference. We have a global issue, but if we all act locally and do what we can, our combined efforts will make a big difference. Think global – act local.

How are S&TC getting involved with IYS?

We will be collaborating with partners all across the Northern Hemisphere to further our research and action on the threats that salmon face. The crucial research costs money. We are an independent charity receiving no government funding and rely on support from concerned, conservation-minded people just like you. You can support our work by becoming a member, or making a donation.

We have a range of exciting events planned to celebrate IYS 2019 and help protect and conserve salmon as part of a global effort. These events will be added to [iys page link]  in the coming weeks. You can also sign up to our newsletter [link] to keep fully up to date with what we are up to and how the International Year of the salmon is progressing.

Atlantic salmon populations across their range are in a serious and consistent decline, yet this important and fascinating species has a relationship with humankind stretching back into prehistory. We will be releasing regular educational resources designed to inspire, inform and enlighten on the plight of the salmon and it's incredible life cycle.

Stay tuned for more news of our involvement in International Year of the Salmon 2019!

2018: A year in review

What have we achieved this year?

2018 has been our biggest year yet! So where has your support got us, and what have we done for wild fish protection and conservation? Our CEO's Year In Review summaries our influence, accomplishments and campaigns over the past 12 months. 

With the help of our many donors, members and grant-making Trusts, S&TC has had a successful year in influencing a number of wins for wild salmon and trout. The below is a quick summary; however you can download the full review here.

Accomplishments:

  • Salmon farming - we were the major catalyst in achieving TWO game-changing Scottish inquiries into salmon farming impacts on wild fish and environment:
    • ECCLR – they conducted the first Inquiry and their Report included the one-liner: the status quo is no longer an option.
    • REC - their Autumn Report was highly critical of the way salmon farming is operated and regulated and presented 65 recommendations for improvement, including most of our main asks.
  • NASCO - we work internationally on wild salmon issues through NASCO, our CEO being co-chair of the accredited NGOs which gives us unprecedented influence. Amongst other issues, we have used NASCO to influence netting closures and pressurise Scottish salmon farming.
  • Riverfly Census - 3 years and 20 rivers later, we have professional and actionable evidence of various pollutants impacting river health, nationally and locally.
    • Census results have shown up the alarmingly poor condition of some of our most high-profile rivers, particularly from sediment and phosphate, and we co-authored a peer-reviewed paper showing the lethal impact of those two stressors on mayflies.
    • The full Riverfly Census report is currently being compiled but has already influenced new invertebrate species and abundance targets for chalkstreams. The Test and Itchen report is now available.
  • Living Rivers - we've been sampling daily phosphate and chemical levels on local chalkstreams, highlighting and challenging some appalling ecological conditions, specifically:
    • Using a case study on the Upper Itchen at Alresford Salad’s washing plant to fight for the elimination of toxic chemical discharges into SAC rivers.
  • Other S&TC policy work - There has been plenty of other work this year, including but definitely not limited to:
    • Water abstraction reform.
    • Agricultural post-Brexit policy.
    • Our seat on the EA’s Water Leaders’ Group, which covers all environmental water issues.
    • Our seat on the National Drought Group, where we have represented wild fisheries since 2011.

Next Steps:

  • Salmon farming - drive the REC Committee’s recommendations through Government so that they are acted upon rather than ignored.  In particular:
    • Scottish Government to adopt legal responsibility to protect wild salmon and sea trout from the impacts of salmon farming.
    • An independent agency to regulate salmon farming against sea lice trigger levels that protect wild fish, with the sanction of forced harvest on persistent offenders.
    • A moratorium on establishing/expanding farms in sensitive locations and movement of existing farms away from migration routes.
    • Incentives for companies to move into closed containment production.
  • Netting - we are concerned that sea trout will still be exploited in some of the north east coastal nets and we will be seeking more action in 2019 to protect sea trout.
  • SMARTrivers - Our new project, based on training and utilising high resolution citizen science to understand and improve wild fish water quality.
  • Living Rivers - We will continue to fight for the protection of the Upper Itchen and have major chemical sampling plans for other rivers in 2019.
  • Much more - stay tuned for our 2019 plans, in January.

Latest data on River Test and River Itchen reveals concerning issues

Test and Itchen are no exception to national decline in water quality and flylife

The S&TC Riverfly Census continues to reveal worrying declines in flylife and water quality in rivers across England and Wales, as confirmed by our latest report on the River Test and the River Itchen (the king and queen of our precious chalkstreams).

In our comprehensive Test and Itchen report published today, the results from three years of independent species-level invertebrate data reveal:

  • Significant loss of mayfly species.
  • Low gammarus counts.
  • Worrying impacts from sediment, phosphate and, occasionally, pesticides.

Mayfly and gammarus declines

Comparing historic data with our findings has revealed that both the Test and Itchen have four less mayfly species, on average, than their historical averages. This decline in mayfly species richness, and the worrying low numbers of gammarus, are powerful indicators of an ecosystem in distress.

The flylife in both rivers is far poorer than we would expect for chalkstreams in good condition  - let alone these SSSI (Sites of special scientific Interest) and SAC (Special Area of Conservation) rivers.

Mayfly species have declined from an average of 12 to 8 (33.3%) on the Itchen and 11 to 7 (36.36%) on the Test, over the period from the late 1970s/early 1980s to today.

The current levels are also well below local targets of 10 mayfly species - targets agreed with the Environment Agency for what would be expected in a healthy river.

Gammarus, a key staple of the aquatic food chain, is also well below our 500-target level at most sites (historically, gammarus counts went into the thousands).

Excess sediment and phosphorus

Our report reveals the extent that chemical, phosphorus and sediment pollution are impacting the invertebrate community in both the Test & Itchen.

It is clear that a reduction of sediment and phosphate inputs (from point and diffuse sources, including septic tanks, agriculture, sewage treatment works, industry, etc) are essential to conserve these rivers.

Importance of the S&TC Riverfly Census

Lauren Mattingley, S&TC’s Science Officer, explains why data like this is so important:

“We frequently hear stories and concerns about missing flylife and lack of fish compared to the 'good old days', but anecdotal evidence has little weight in environmental decision making.

The Riverfly Census was launched as a ‘myth-busting’ tool to collect much needed high-resolution, scientifically robust data about the real state of water quality in our rivers.

Switching from opinion to fact-based evidence gives us real power to drive national and local improvements to our waterways.

“The Test & Itchen report is a fantastic example of why we need to break away from data ‘silos’.

The Riverfly Census data tells a story on its own, but when linked up with additional local invertebrate and phosphorus monitoring data, we can really start to grasp the pressures on these rivers.

The environment is complex, and stressors rarely work in isolation, so why would we conduct monitoring this way?”

Turning science into action

The Census is no mere academic exercise. We are using this powerful data to inform and build effective strategies which improve wild fish habitat:

  • We are acting on the Census results to improve water quality in these rivers, working with stakeholders in the area.
  • We are tackling known sources of pollution; such as the Bakkavor salad washing plant on the Itchen headwaters, and intensive watercress farming on both the Test and the Itchen.
  • Our findings on the Itchen impelled us to challenge the EA under the Environmental Damage Regulations. We are awaiting the EA’s response.
  • To share the Riverfly Census results from the Test and Itchen and drive further improvements to these rivers, we will be holding a workshop on 12th February 2019. A key aim of the workshop will be to highlight knowledge gaps and develop next steps with a range of stakeholders, regulators and scientists. Please contact Lauren (lauren@salmon-trout.org) if you or your organisation would like to book a place at the workshop.

Why you should go salmon-free this Christmas

A Christmas favourite it may be; but there is nothing festive nor joyous about farmed salmon.

Salmon is considered by many to be a Christmas staple, its murky journey from net-pen to plate concealed behind tinsel-clad wrapping and slick marketing.

Two parliamentary inquiries have this year confirmed the need for rapid change in salmon farming, which is causing widespread environmental destruction and the devastation of wild fish. We have campaigned for these changes for years; but what can be done until this happens...?

And for the uninitiated, what are the issues with farmed salmon? Our CEO, Paul Knight, explains why farmed salmon is best avoided - at Christmas, and until the industry changes...

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Why you should go salmon-free this Christmas

This year’s reports from two Scottish Parliamentary Committees - Environment, Climate Change and Land Reform (ECCLR), and Rural Economy and Connectivity (REC) – following their inquiries into salmon farming, are both unequivocal; we have to adopt a far more precautionary approach to salmon farming to stop it damaging wild salmon and sea trout populations.

Quite apart from the many millions of farmed salmon dying in their cages every year through disease, parasites and the negative effects of both physical and chemical treatments for sea lice, the stark fact is that politicians from all Scottish political parties agree that Scotland’s already beleaguered wild migratory fish stocks need to be protected from the impacts of open-net salmon farming on Scotland’s west coast and Islands.

These reports vindicate Salmon & Trout Conservation’s strong campaigning over many years – the ECCLR and REC inquiries only came about because of our official Petition to Scottish Parliament in 2016 – and confirm what most of us have known for years. The challenge for us now is to drive through the Committees’ recommendations so that Scottish Government introduces, as a matter of urgency, far stronger regulation of the salmon farming industry.

This includes more sensitive siting of farms, well away from wild salmon and sea trout migration routes. One of S&TC’s key objectives received prominence in the REC Committee report - the incentivisation of companies to invest in closed containment units that physically and biologically separate farmed salmon from the natural environment and wild fish.

However, that all takes time. So what can we do?

Take a stand for wild fish

What we, as consumers, can do right now is to drive home the message to salmon producers by refusing to buy any farmed salmon products this Christmas (or indeed at any time until the industry becomes environmentally sustainable).

Forget ‘organic’ salmon (here's why), or any other marketing gimmick that tries to tell you these fish are farmed responsibly.

Read more: Organic Farmed Salmon - Let's Get Real

As it stands today, all open-net salmon farming can cause problems. None are truly environmentally sustainable.

❌ There is always the very real risk that any farm can suffer from too many sea lice parasites, which then release huge numbers of sea lice larvae into sea lochs, where they attack wild fish.

❌ Any farm can also suffer human error or storm damage that allows large numbers of farmed salmon to escape and breed with wild salmon and dilute natural gene pools.

❌ And then there is the fouling of the sea bed around cages...

❌ And those millions of dead salmon that never make it to the market because disease or chemical treatment, or just plain bad husbandry, kill them first.

❌ And more...

Urgent action now required

As the Scottish Parliamentary Committees have now identified, the Scottish Government has to act fast and decisively to save the worst parts of the industry from itself and, in doing so, save wild fish. Action now help ensure that wild salmon and sea trout are genuinely protected in Scotland.

Until then, we can send a clear message to salmon producers, just as Scottish Parliamentary Committee members have this year - current salmon farming practices are just not acceptable anymore, and the industry must evolve quickly if it is to win back the public’s confidence to buy its products again.

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So, this Christmas (and until standards improve) take a stand for wild fish by taking a hard pass on any farmed salmon. Use the power you have - the power of the mighty Pound.