S&TC joins partners across the Northern Hemisphere to launch the International Year of the Salmon (IYS) 2019

S&TC joins partners across the Northern Hemisphere to launch the International Year of the Salmon (IYS) 2019

One of the more significant things on our 2019 radar is the International Year of the Salmon; an opportunity to further our important work, collaborate with other salmon conservationists and help spread the word about these beautiful creatures who are sadly struggling.

What is the International Year of the Salmon (IYS)?

IYS is a North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organization (NASCO) and North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission (NPAFC) initiative to support the conservation and restoration of wild salmon species. You can view the official IYS page here.

Salmon are at risk from environmental change and human activities across the Northern Hemisphere, but saving these beautiful and influential creatures requires a uniquely large-scale solution. The International Year of the Salmon sets out to protect salmon by bringing people together to share knowledge, raise public awareness and take action. We have a chance to save not just salmon, but also the communities and cultures that depend on them.

Why do Atlantic salmon need our help?

Wild Atlantic salmon are one of the world’s most iconic species, and a vital indicator of healthy aquatic environments. Their epic migration is one of nature’s greatest stories, swimming thousands of kilometres from home rivers to Northern Hemisphere oceans and back again. A rich cultural history has ensued, where people’s lives and ancestries have been shaped by their interactions with salmon.

Find out more about Atlantic salmon and their plight

However, Atlantic salmon are in a perilous state in their marine and freshwater environments. This is due to environmental change, as well as human activities. IYS will bring people together to share knowledge, stimulate investment in research, and raise public awareness to take appropriate action for salmon.  We have an opportunity to save not just salmon and their environments for future generations, but also the communities and cultures that depend on them.

How will IYS help wild salmon?

  • CONNECTION: The International Year of the Salmon brings together countries across the Northern Hemisphere, because no single country can hope to address fully the challenges that salmon face over their amazing migrations. In their epic migrations through rivers and oceans salmon know no borders; to help them we have to reach across borders and build bridges between countries and cultures.
  • KNOWLEDGE: The International Year of the Salmon will harness ongoing research and kick start partnerships and public action in Europe, North America and Asia to give salmon a better chance to survive and thrive. People across the Northern Hemisphere need to understand more about how migrating Atlantic salmon are unique, complex fish that are infinitely precious to those countries where they migrate, breed, give birth and die. Collaborating and sharing knowledge is essential to learn how best to help salmon.The International Year of the Salmon will draw on science, Indigenous knowledge, and the experience of fishers, policy makers, resource managers and others working to conserve and protect salmon.
  • ACTION: The negative effects that humans have on salmon are now at crucial levels – but it’s not too late. Anyone who cares about the survival of salmon can get involved in the International Year of the Salmon. Experts are needed – but it will take the passion and commitment of people from all walks of life to make the difference. Even the smallest contribution can help. Everyone has a role to play. Even if you've never seen salmon in the wild, the chances are they play a vital role in ecosystems essential to you. The International Year of the Salmon is your chance to join people across the world to make a difference. We have a global issue, but if we all act locally and do what we can, our combined efforts will make a big difference. Think global – act local.

How are S&TC getting involved with IYS?

We will be collaborating with partners all across the Northern Hemisphere to further our research and action on the threats that salmon face. The crucial research costs money. We are an independent charity receiving no government funding and rely on support from concerned, conservation-minded people just like you. You can support our work by becoming a member, or making a donation.

We have a range of exciting events planned to celebrate IYS 2019 and help protect and conserve salmon as part of a global effort. These events will be added to [iys page link]  in the coming weeks. You can also sign up to our newsletter [link] to keep fully up to date with what we are up to and how the International Year of the salmon is progressing.

Atlantic salmon populations across their range are in a serious and consistent decline, yet this important and fascinating species has a relationship with humankind stretching back into prehistory. We will be releasing regular educational resources designed to inspire, inform and enlighten on the plight of the salmon and it's incredible life cycle.

Stay tuned for more news of our involvement in International Year of the Salmon 2019!

2018: A year in review

What have we achieved this year?

2018 has been our biggest year yet! So where has your support got us, and what have we done for wild fish protection and conservation? Our CEO's Year In Review summaries our influence, accomplishments and campaigns over the past 12 months. 

With the help of our many donors, members and grant-making Trusts, S&TC has had a successful year in influencing a number of wins for wild salmon and trout. The below is a quick summary; however you can download the full review here.

Accomplishments:

  • Salmon farming - we were the major catalyst in achieving TWO game-changing Scottish inquiries into salmon farming impacts on wild fish and environment:
    • ECCLR – they conducted the first Inquiry and their Report included the one-liner: the status quo is no longer an option.
    • REC - their Autumn Report was highly critical of the way salmon farming is operated and regulated and presented 65 recommendations for improvement, including most of our main asks.
  • NASCO - we work internationally on wild salmon issues through NASCO, our CEO being co-chair of the accredited NGOs which gives us unprecedented influence. Amongst other issues, we have used NASCO to influence netting closures and pressurise Scottish salmon farming.
  • Riverfly Census - 3 years and 20 rivers later, we have professional and actionable evidence of various pollutants impacting river health, nationally and locally.
    • Census results have shown up the alarmingly poor condition of some of our most high-profile rivers, particularly from sediment and phosphate, and we co-authored a peer-reviewed paper showing the lethal impact of those two stressors on mayflies.
    • The full Riverfly Census report is currently being compiled but has already influenced new invertebrate species and abundance targets for chalkstreams. The Test and Itchen report is now available.
  • Living Rivers - we've been sampling daily phosphate and chemical levels on local chalkstreams, highlighting and challenging some appalling ecological conditions, specifically:
    • Using a case study on the Upper Itchen at Alresford Salad’s washing plant to fight for the elimination of toxic chemical discharges into SAC rivers.
  • Other S&TC policy work - There has been plenty of other work this year, including but definitely not limited to:
    • Water abstraction reform.
    • Agricultural post-Brexit policy.
    • Our seat on the EA’s Water Leaders’ Group, which covers all environmental water issues.
    • Our seat on the National Drought Group, where we have represented wild fisheries since 2011.

Next Steps:

  • Salmon farming - drive the REC Committee’s recommendations through Government so that they are acted upon rather than ignored.  In particular:
    • Scottish Government to adopt legal responsibility to protect wild salmon and sea trout from the impacts of salmon farming.
    • An independent agency to regulate salmon farming against sea lice trigger levels that protect wild fish, with the sanction of forced harvest on persistent offenders.
    • A moratorium on establishing/expanding farms in sensitive locations and movement of existing farms away from migration routes.
    • Incentives for companies to move into closed containment production.
  • Netting - we are concerned that sea trout will still be exploited in some of the north east coastal nets and we will be seeking more action in 2019 to protect sea trout.
  • SMARTrivers - Our new project, based on training and utilising high resolution citizen science to understand and improve wild fish water quality.
  • Living Rivers - We will continue to fight for the protection of the Upper Itchen and have major chemical sampling plans for other rivers in 2019.
  • Much more - stay tuned for our 2019 plans, in January.

Latest data on River Test and River Itchen reveals concerning issues

Test and Itchen are no exception to national decline in water quality and flylife

The S&TC Riverfly Census continues to reveal worrying declines in flylife and water quality in rivers across England and Wales, as confirmed by our latest report on the River Test and the River Itchen (the king and queen of our precious chalkstreams).

In our comprehensive Test and Itchen report published today, the results from three years of independent species-level invertebrate data reveal:

  • Significant loss of mayfly species.
  • Low gammarus counts.
  • Worrying impacts from sediment, phosphate and, occasionally, pesticides.

Mayfly and gammarus declines

Comparing historic data with our findings has revealed that both the Test and Itchen have four less mayfly species, on average, than their historical averages. This decline in mayfly species richness, and the worrying low numbers of gammarus, are powerful indicators of an ecosystem in distress.

The flylife in both rivers is far poorer than we would expect for chalkstreams in good condition  - let alone these SSSI (Sites of special scientific Interest) and SAC (Special Area of Conservation) rivers.

Mayfly species have declined from an average of 12 to 8 (33.3%) on the Itchen and 11 to 7 (36.36%) on the Test, over the period from the late 1970s/early 1980s to today.

The current levels are also well below local targets of 10 mayfly species - targets agreed with the Environment Agency for what would be expected in a healthy river.

Gammarus, a key staple of the aquatic food chain, is also well below our 500-target level at most sites (historically, gammarus counts went into the thousands).

Excess sediment and phosphorus

Our report reveals the extent that chemical, phosphorus and sediment pollution are impacting the invertebrate community in both the Test & Itchen.

It is clear that a reduction of sediment and phosphate inputs (from point and diffuse sources, including septic tanks, agriculture, sewage treatment works, industry, etc) are essential to conserve these rivers.

Importance of the S&TC Riverfly Census

Lauren Mattingley, S&TC’s Science Officer, explains why data like this is so important:

“We frequently hear stories and concerns about missing flylife and lack of fish compared to the 'good old days', but anecdotal evidence has little weight in environmental decision making.

The Riverfly Census was launched as a ‘myth-busting’ tool to collect much needed high-resolution, scientifically robust data about the real state of water quality in our rivers.

Switching from opinion to fact-based evidence gives us real power to drive national and local improvements to our waterways.

“The Test & Itchen report is a fantastic example of why we need to break away from data ‘silos’.

The Riverfly Census data tells a story on its own, but when linked up with additional local invertebrate and phosphorus monitoring data, we can really start to grasp the pressures on these rivers.

The environment is complex, and stressors rarely work in isolation, so why would we conduct monitoring this way?”

Turning science into action

The Census is no mere academic exercise. We are using this powerful data to inform and build effective strategies which improve wild fish habitat:

  • We are acting on the Census results to improve water quality in these rivers, working with stakeholders in the area.
  • We are tackling known sources of pollution; such as the Bakkavor salad washing plant on the Itchen headwaters, and intensive watercress farming on both the Test and the Itchen.
  • Our findings on the Itchen impelled us to challenge the EA under the Environmental Damage Regulations. We are awaiting the EA’s response.
  • To share the Riverfly Census results from the Test and Itchen and drive further improvements to these rivers, we will be holding a workshop on 12th February 2019. A key aim of the workshop will be to highlight knowledge gaps and develop next steps with a range of stakeholders, regulators and scientists. Please contact Lauren (lauren@salmon-trout.org) if you or your organisation would like to book a place at the workshop.

Why you should go salmon-free this Christmas

A Christmas favourite it may be; but there is nothing festive nor joyous about farmed salmon.

Salmon is considered by many to be a Christmas staple, its murky journey from net-pen to plate concealed behind tinsel-clad wrapping and slick marketing.

Two parliamentary inquiries have this year confirmed the need for rapid change in salmon farming, which is causing widespread environmental destruction and the devastation of wild fish. We have campaigned for these changes for years; but what can be done until this happens...?

And for the uninitiated, what are the issues with farmed salmon? Our CEO, Paul Knight, explains why farmed salmon is best avoided - at Christmas, and until the industry changes...

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Why you should go salmon-free this Christmas

This year’s reports from two Scottish Parliamentary Committees - Environment, Climate Change and Land Reform (ECCLR), and Rural Economy and Connectivity (REC) – following their inquiries into salmon farming, are both unequivocal; we have to adopt a far more precautionary approach to salmon farming to stop it damaging wild salmon and sea trout populations.

Quite apart from the many millions of farmed salmon dying in their cages every year through disease, parasites and the negative effects of both physical and chemical treatments for sea lice, the stark fact is that politicians from all Scottish political parties agree that Scotland’s already beleaguered wild migratory fish stocks need to be protected from the impacts of open-net salmon farming on Scotland’s west coast and Islands.

These reports vindicate Salmon & Trout Conservation’s strong campaigning over many years – the ECCLR and REC inquiries only came about because of our official Petition to Scottish Parliament in 2016 – and confirm what most of us have known for years. The challenge for us now is to drive through the Committees’ recommendations so that Scottish Government introduces, as a matter of urgency, far stronger regulation of the salmon farming industry.

This includes more sensitive siting of farms, well away from wild salmon and sea trout migration routes. One of S&TC’s key objectives received prominence in the REC Committee report - the incentivisation of companies to invest in closed containment units that physically and biologically separate farmed salmon from the natural environment and wild fish.

However, that all takes time. So what can we do?

Take a stand for wild fish

What we, as consumers, can do right now is to drive home the message to salmon producers by refusing to buy any farmed salmon products this Christmas (or indeed at any time until the industry becomes environmentally sustainable).

Forget ‘organic’ salmon (here's why), or any other marketing gimmick that tries to tell you these fish are farmed responsibly.

Read more: Organic Farmed Salmon - Let's Get Real

As it stands today, all open-net salmon farming can cause problems. None are truly environmentally sustainable.

❌ There is always the very real risk that any farm can suffer from too many sea lice parasites, which then release huge numbers of sea lice larvae into sea lochs, where they attack wild fish.

❌ Any farm can also suffer human error or storm damage that allows large numbers of farmed salmon to escape and breed with wild salmon and dilute natural gene pools.

❌ And then there is the fouling of the sea bed around cages...

❌ And those millions of dead salmon that never make it to the market because disease or chemical treatment, or just plain bad husbandry, kill them first.

❌ And more...

Urgent action now required

As the Scottish Parliamentary Committees have now identified, the Scottish Government has to act fast and decisively to save the worst parts of the industry from itself and, in doing so, save wild fish. Action now help ensure that wild salmon and sea trout are genuinely protected in Scotland.

Until then, we can send a clear message to salmon producers, just as Scottish Parliamentary Committee members have this year - current salmon farming practices are just not acceptable anymore, and the industry must evolve quickly if it is to win back the public’s confidence to buy its products again.

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So, this Christmas (and until standards improve) take a stand for wild fish by taking a hard pass on any farmed salmon. Use the power you have - the power of the mighty Pound.

#ProtectWater campaign success: brilliant news for our waters and fish

First success for #ProtectWater campaign

Thanks to an extensive collaborative effort from over 100 NGO's across Europe, including S&TC, an important first milestone has been achieved in the defence of our water's environmental protection laws.

A paper drafted by a group of government officials, seeking to weaken the laws which currently protect our waters, has NOT been endorsed at the recent Water Directors' meeting.

Government officials from Member States prepared a paper for last week’s meeting of Water Directors - who represent their national governments on all decisions related to water management. The paper included a series of proposed changes to the WFD which, if ever put into effect, would constitute a significant weakening of the legislation.

Collaborative effort from NGO's

However, thanks to a joint and sustained policy and communications effort from NGO's across Europe, the paper was not endorsed by Water Directors. Prior to the meeting, Water Directors were sent numerous letters and communications urging they maintain the environment and protect the WFD - as explicitly recognised in the discussion and in the final report of the meeting, which stated:

"Water Directors reiterated their conviction that the WFD is a center-piece of EU water legislation and has been highly instrumental for progress achieved in protecting and improving the status of European waters so far.

They emphasized that the level of ambition of the WFD and its objectives should be maintained. They also stressed the need to focus efforts on achieving the WFD objectives, and highlighted that water using sectors responsible for the pressures leading to a failure in achieving the objectives should contribute to these efforts."

These succesfull communications and documents were borne of, and sent on behalf of, the Living Rivers Europe coalition; as well as a multitude of individuals, NGO's and other government officials. Water Directors were receptive, indeed;

"They thanked the consultation group for its work and the document prepared. They took full note of the concerns raised by NGOs and stakeholders".

This could not have been achieved without such a co-ordinated effort, and this result is a testament to the power of the #ProtectWater movement of 100+ organisations, of which S&TC are proud to be a part of.

Next steps

The paper will now be discussed at the meeting of the Strategic Coordination Group (SCG) early next year; the issues it contains to be addressed by the Water Directors of the Member States only after various European Commission assessments, i.e. the end of 2019.

So there is still a long way to go, and we still need many more submissions to the European Commission's consultation...

Help us Protect Water and wild fish in the UK

Despite this strong start, the battle is far from over and we still need your help to keep our water laws strong, especially on the eve of Brexit.

Please click here to find out more about the campaign and to have your say with the European Commission, using our simple consultation form. Please, for the sake of our wild fish and their habitats, ACT NOW and help us #PotectWater.

SIFCA Consultation: Help us ban inshore netting which threatens salmon & trout

Join S&TC in seeking to ban inshore netting in Dorset, Hampshire and the Isle of Wight to help protect genetically-unique chalkstream salmon and sea trout.

Salmon & Trout Conservation has responded to an important consultation on the future of net fishing in the harbours and estuarine waters of the South Coast.

We want a cessation of netting in these areas out to one mile off-shore.

Anything less is not sufficiently protective of our vulnerable migratory fish, and many other species such as bass and mullet:

  • Recent research has shown that Southern Chalkstream salmon are genetically distinct from all other European populations and we therefore have an extra responsibility to protect them.
  • These waters form an important migratory route for salmon and sea trout throughout the year as they enter and leave rivers.
  • They also provide nursery and refuge areas for a wide range of fish species such as bass and mullet. These species also need protection.

The consulting body, the Southern Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority (Southern IFCA for short), is proposing a change in netting rules to ban drift and fixed nets but to allow the use of ring nets in the Southern IFCA district.

We consider the threat from ring netting to salmon and sea trout (let alone bass and mullet) to still be too high for these nets to be allowed. We recommend a ban on all inshore netting to one mile offshore in the Southern IFCA district.

How can you help?

Please respond to the Southern IFCA consultation by the closing date of 7 December 2018.

The official documents are available on the SIFCA website. Please follow these steps to submit your input to the consultation:

  1. Click on this link to take you to the overview page on the Southern IFCA website.
  2. Download the 'Southern IFCA Consultation Document' - available directly here in Word Doc (the SIFCA website, unhelpfully, contains only a PDF - we have provided a Word Doc for easy editing).
  3. Complete your answers from page 18 onwards - please feel free to use our responses. You can view our full PDF submission here, OR simply use our word doc of answers only (for ease of copying).
  4. Responses must be submitted by 7 th December 2018. You can respond in writing by email to: enquiries@southern-ifca.gov.uk. Or by post to: Southern IFCA, 64 Ashley Road, Parkstone, Poole, Dorset BH14 9BN.

Your responses truly count – numbers matter!

Important Links

Anne Voss-Bark Memorial Award 2018: Winner announced

Anne Voss-Bark Memorial Award 2018: Winner Announced at Arundell Arms

S&TC are proud to announce that their prestigious Anne Voss-Bark Memorial Award 2018 has been awarded to PHD student William Davison, of Exeter University.

The award was presented to William on the 10th of October at the Arundell Arms, by proprietor, and Anne-voss Bark's son, Adam Fox Edwards and S&TC Executive Vice-President Tony Bird, in a lunch attended by award partners, the Fario Club and West Country Rivers Trust.

Above: Adam Fox Edwards (Arundel Arms), William Davison and Tony Bird (S&TC)

Set up by S&TC in 2014, in collaboration with the Arundel Arms and Fario Club, the Anne Voss-Bark Memorial Award provides successful applicants with invaluable work experience with the West Country Rivers Trust; learning catchment management and water science from the trust's eminent scientists, including a fly fishing course and complimentary stay at the Arundell Arms hotel.

The award is open each year to young fisheries or aquatic students and offers an unbeatable opportunity to learn the practical elements of river restoration and management.

 

Anne Voss-Bark Memorial Award 2018 Winner

William Davison, a first year PhD student from the University of Exeter, with a background in ecological physiology, is this year's lucky winner of the award.

He brings his extensive field skills to the placement, gained during his research career at the University of Exeter and associated study abroad year at the University Of Queensland, which took him to remote Heron Island. He says,

“This placement allows me to see first-hand how local charities are working on the front line to restore and protect the aquatic environments around which I grew up, and the animals on which I have chosen to focus my research studies."

William has recently finished the placement and has now returned to his PhD in aquatic biology, working specifically on land-based recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) for salmonids. Such work aligns closely with S&TC's vision and campaign for closed contentment salmon farming in Scotland. William says,

"The opportunity to learn about management of wild salmon and trout allows me to take a more holistic approach to my PhD by including a wider understanding of management strategies for wild populations.

This experience puts me in a better informed position to help promote aquaculture techniques that allow farmed and wild salmonids to both thrive and perform the vital services we require of them."

Wild fish and their habitats were of great importance to Anne Voss-Bark, and the award recognises and nurtures the same passion in it's students. Dr Janina Gray, Head of Science at S&TC, says,

“William demonstrates why this award is so important and offers such an amazing opportunity for someone just starting their career and are passionate about making a difference for our wild salmon and sea trout. The award offers unbeatable work experience and invaluable exposure to all our organisations' campaigning and projects”

 

Anne Voss-Bark

Anne Voss-Bark was a dedicated conservationist and prominent hotelier. Her love of fly fishing made her aware of changes in the countryside detrimental to our rivers and fish, which she worked tirelessly to combat.

Anne will also always be well-remembered as the perfect hostess at the Arundell Arms in Lifton, Devon, which was rather run down on acquisition but developed by her over nearly 50 years into today’s eminent fishing and country sports hotel.

S&TC are proud to honour the memory of Anne Voss-Bark through the award, nurturing the next generation of aquatic scientists and conservationists in the process.

S&TC joins 100 NGOs in Europe-wide #ProtectWater campaign

S&TC is one of 100 NGOs[1 ] joining forces across Europe to tackle proposed weakening of EU freshwater protection laws

As part of #ProtectWater, we are uniting to launch a campaign calling on the European Commission to defend the law that protects all sources of water, such as rivers, lakes, wetlands and groundwater, during its current review.

Such laws are integral to the future health and abundance of wild fish, especially salmon and trout who urgently need their waters better protected from over-abstraction, barriers to migration and all forms of pollution. To weaken these laws further would certainly speed up salmon and trout's disappearance from our waterways, primarily through a loss of important habitat and a degradation of their water quality.

It is essential to support this law in the UK, as any weakening of this EU legislation will be transposed into UK law post-Brexit and will mean weaker protections for our waters.

Working together to protect water

The #ProtectWater campaign encourages people across the UK and Europe to participate in the European Commission’s public consultation on the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD), which is running until 4 March 2019.

This is the only opportunity for the general public to express their support to keep water protections strong and effective. To get involved people can simply and quickly sign-up here.

 

Andreas Baumüller, Head of Natural Resources at WWF’s European Policy Office, said:

‘Member States’ half-hearted implementation of the EU water law is a crime in itself, but their desperate attempts to weaken it - and before the Commission’s fitness check has even concluded - is a step too far.

We urge citizens across Europe and beyond to join forces through the #ProtectWater campaign and make their voices heard.

We all need clean water, and without the Water Framework Directive, this will be under serious threat. Act now to defend the EU water law!’

 

Dr Janina Gray, S&TC’s Head of Science & Environmental Policy, said,

“The Water Framework Directive gives a basic protection for our rivers and waterlife, and has resulted over the years in millions of pounds of investment, mainly from water companies.

Any weakening of the WFD standards would have catastrophic implications for our waterways.

We are looking for Government commitment for greater protection for rivers, streams and wild fish following Brexit, and so ensuring that WFD’ standards remain as they are is of paramount importance to drive this.”

 

Hannah Freeman, Senior Government Affairs Officer at Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust (WWT) and Chair of the Blueprint for Water group in the UK, said: 

The Water Framework Directive has had a massive impact in the UK, including getting water companies to invest billions in cleaning up our rivers and restoring our aquatic habitats.

Protecting this law is essential to defend our basic human right to clean water and for all nature to thrive.’

 

Why are such laws important?

Freshwater ecosystems are the most threatened on the planet [2].

Sixty percent of EU waters are not healthy today because Member States have allowed them to be exploited and damaged for example by unsustainable agriculture, and destructive infrastructure, such as dams.

Shockingly, only 14% of rivers in England are classed as healthy. [3].

Through the WFD, Member States agreed to achieve “good status” for their waters by 2027 at the very latest. 2027 is also the year which the #ProtectWater campaign playfully poses as the fictional ‘expiration date’ for good beer.

Where political will exists, the WFD provides an effective framework for addressing the main pressures facing our waters [4], but Member States need to significantly step up their efforts and funding if the 2027 deadlines are to be achieved.

Results to improve the health of their waters have been few and far between, and Member States are now discussing how the law can be weakened to introduce greater flexibility for themselves.

More information about the #ProtectWater campaign is available at: www.livingrivers.eu or on the S&TC website:

Notes to editors: 

1. The #ProtectWater campaign is led by WWF EU, the European Environmental Bureau, European Anglers Alliance, European Rivers Network and Wetlands International, who together form the Living Rivers Europe coalition and have more than 40 million supporters between them. More than 100 organisations are backing the campaign.

In the UK a coalition of 11 organisations coordinated by Wildlife and Countryside Link are supporting the campaign including: Angling Trust and Fish Legal, British Canoeing, Freshwater Habitats Trust, Institute of Fisheries Management, Marine Conservation Society, The Rivers Trust, RSPB, Salmon and Trout Conservation, Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust (WWT), WWF-UK and ZSL Zoological Society of London.

2. Living Planet Report, WWF, 2016
3. European waters: Assessment of status and pressures 2018, EEA, 2018
4. Bringing life back to Europe’s waters: The EU water law in action, 2018

 

About the Water Framework Directive (WFD) and Living Rivers Europe

  • The WFD is one of the EU’s most progressive pieces of environmental legislation. It requires the protection, enhancement and restoration of our rivers, wetlands, lakes and coastal waters, but Member States are currently failing make it work on the ground.
  • Under the WFD, EU governments have committed to ensure no deterioration and achieve good status for the vast majority of all water bodies by 2015, and at the very latest by 2027.
  • Where implemented, the WFD has proved to be effective in achieving its goals of good water status and non-deterioration, successfully balancing environmental, social and economic requirements.
  • The WFD is currently undergoing its standard review in the form of a ‘fitness check’. Every piece of EU legislation goes through this process. The fitness check will look at the relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, coherence and EU added value of the WFD (and its 'daughter’ directives) and the Floods Directive. It includes the ongoing stakeholder consultation and public consultation.
  • As the Living Rivers Europe coalition, we are working on safeguarding the EU WFD and strengthening its implementation and enforcement. Click here to read the full Living Rivers Europe vision statement.

Hardy partners with S&TC to help conserve wild fish

Hardy partners with S&TC

Salmon & Trout Conservation are proud to announce an exciting new partnership with leading tackle manufacturer, Hardy.

The collaboration will see the two organisations work together on various projects to conserve wild fish and their waters, including the production and auction of two truly bespoke Hardy outfits for S&TC’s glittering Annual Auction this November.

The flagship lot at this year’s auction is an extremely generous contribution from Hardy, with whom S&TC are proud to announce an exciting long-term partnership. Defined by their 1800's heritage and English-made, top quality tackle, such a collaboration combines not just Hardy’s and S&TC’s expertise and heritage, but their mutual passion for protecting wild fish and their habitats.

Conserving wild fish together

As the UK's leading wild fish charity, S&TC has been protecting and preserving our wild fish and freshwaters for over 115 years. Originally tackling the environmental pressures of the Industrial Revolution, S&TC today continue to achieve important successes for wild salmon and trout driven by three highly actionable conservation focuses: water quality, water quantity and protection from salmon farming.

This vision is defined and delivered through S&TC’s independent, science-led and action-driven campaigns. The charity receives no government money, their important work funded entirely by private donations, memberships and fundraising initiatives, such as their Annual Dinner and Auction at Fishmonger’s Hall in London, now in its 10th year.

As prominent wild fish conservationists, Hardy are proudly committed to protecting salmon, trout and the UK's waterways, which their partnership with S&TC is integral to achieving.

 

Exclusive auction lots

In an act of support for the cause, Hardy have generously donated two exceptional lots to the S&TC Annual Auction this year, which are expected to achieve handsome sums for S&TC’s important work:


Unique S&TC Hardy Complete Angler Outfit

  • One of a kind, 001 of 001
  • 1 x Hardy Salmon Smuggler 14'6"#10 rod with limited edition Hardy 'Perfect' reel
  • 1 x Hardy Trout Smuggler 9'0"#5 rod with limited edition Hardy 'Perfect' reel
  • Both to include matching fitted fly lines
  • 1 x Richard Wheatley handmade fly box with assortment of trout flies
  • 1 x Richard Wheatley handmade fly box with assortment of salmon flies
  • Presented in a custom-built leather case by Casecraft UK (case valued at £3k)

Bespoke S&TC Hardy Trout Smuggler Set

  • 1 of 115 S&TC units, to celebrate our 115th year
  • 1 x Hardy Trout Smuggler 9'0"#5 rod with limited edition Hardy 'Perfect' reel
  • 1 x matching fitted fly line
  • 1 x Handmade Richard Wheatley fly box with an assortment of trout flies
  • Presented in an aluminium flight case with laser cut foam liner

Bespoke collector's items

The Hardy Complete Angler Outfit is an entirely unique, never to be repeated, bespoke item, which is currently being handcrafted for S&TC at Hardy’s headquarters at Alnwick, England.

The Hardy Trout Smuggler is equally special; 1 of 115 to celebrate the 115 years that S&TC has been actively conserving wild fish in the UK.

Official photographs of the exclusive lots, which are expected to appeal to collectors and keen anglers alike, are expected soon. In the meantime, you can find out more  on our Hardy page.

 

Find out more and make a sealed bid

The lots are part of S&TC’s exclusive live auction on the 14th November 2018, which is now sold out. However, S&TC are accepting private sealed bids.

Please follow the link below, or contact S&TC’s fundraising manager, Guy Edwards, to find out more and/or submit bids: Guy@salmon-trout.org | 01425 652 461.

Anne Voss-Bark Memorial Award 2018

In its fourth year, the Anne Voss-Bark Memorial Award 2018 is now open to students.

See below for details on this exciting award, and please share with any suitable students you may know.

 

What is the Anne Voss-Bark Memorial Award?

Set up by Salmon & Trout Conservation in collaboration with the Arundel Arms and Fario Club, the Anne Voss-Bark Memorial Award 2018 offers students:

  • One week work experience with the West Country Rivers Trust; learning catchment management and water science from the Trusts eminent scientists
  • Two day fly fishing course
  • Complimentary stay at the Arundell Arms hotel during the work experience
  • £250

The work experience for the winning student will be organised for this autumn.

 

Who is the Anne Voss-Bark Award open to?

The award is open to young fisheries or aquatic students and offers an unbeatable opportunity to study the practical elements of river restoration and management.

 

What does a previous winner say?

Vicky Fowler, from Holmfirth, Yorkshire who studied biological science at Exeter University, is a previous winner of the Award and found the experience extremely beneficial in her future career. She says,

“This was such a rewarding experience and it was the first time that I had appreciated how science impacts in the real world.

It was a fantastic opportunity to learn about the practical side of river management, including conservation, catchment management, identifying funding opportunities and communicating with different stakeholders. I really did learn a huge amount.”

Vicky is now working towards gaining a PhD and is studying with the British Antarctic survey team. Her eventual aim is to stay in the aquatic conservation field but working on a very practical level.

Dr Janina Gray, Head of Science at S&TC, says,

“Vicky is a fantastic example of why this Award is so important and offers such an amazing opportunity for young fisheries/aquatic students to gain unbeatable work experience.”

 

Who was Ann Voss-Bark?

Anne Voss-Bark was a dedicated conservationist and prominent hotelier. Her love of fly fishing made her aware of changes in the countryside detrimental to our rivers and fish. She worked tirelessly to see this demise reversed.

Anne was a strong supporter of the S&TC (then S&TA), the only UK fisheries campaigning charity. She was a Council Member, Vice Chairman and finally Vice President of the charity.

Anne, with others, also founded the West Country Rivers Trust, embracing the concept of total river management.

Anne will also always be well-remembered as the perfect hostess at the Arundell Arms in Lifton, Devon, which was rather run down on acquisition but developed by her over nearly 50 years into today’s eminent fishing and country sports hotel.

 

How can students apply for the Anne Voss-Bark Award 2018?

Wild fish and their habitats were of great importance to Anne, and we look for the same level of  passion in our applicants.

To apply, in no more than 500 words explain what this work experience opportunity means to you, why you should get this opportunity, and how it would benefit you.

The Closing date for applications is 31st July 2018.

To submit an entry or for further information on the Award, please contact Dr Janina Gray, Head of Science at S&TC by email on: janina@salmon-trout.org