S&TC auction offers lots from fishing to feasting that money can’t buy

Keen cricketing fans will be rushing to bid in Salmon & Trout Conservation's annual auction for a rare chance to fish and then enjoy lunch on the glorious River Itchen in the esteemed company of the one and only voice of cricket; Henry Calthorpe Blofeld or ‘Blowers' as he is often affectionately called.

This unique opportunity to eat, meet and fish with a celebrity hero or two like Henry Blofeld is up for grabs in our renowned charity auction.

The S&TC annual on-line, silent and ‘live' auctions are gearing up to offer some truly remarkable and rare opportunities to bid for exclusive fishing opportunities, stunning works of art, fishing and feasting packages as well as special shoot days.

The online auction opens on 18th September and will run for six-weeks, while the silent and live auctions will be held during our prestigious Dinner, held in the classic splendour of Fishmongers' Hall in London on Thursday 12th October. The redesigned auction site will include the facility for bidders not attending the Dinner to leave commission bids on those items only on offer at the Dinner.

Veronica Kruger, the S&TC Dinner and Auction organiser says:

"At last year's auction and dinner we raised an impressive £100,000. With the support of our generous donors and bidders we feel very confident that we will raise even more this year. There is something for everyone and to suit every pocket in both the online and live auctions. From a VIP day at Newbury Races to a classic two nights fishing break at the famous Arundell Arms in Devon. Generous donations mean that we can offer sculpture, art, dining, fine wines, and a wide variety of fishing – sea trout, salmon, grayling and bass, from the chalkstreams and coastline of southern England all the way to the Outer Hebrides. Guide prices start at just £50."

Paul Knight, Chief Executive of S&TC says:

"We rely heavily on this major annual fund-raising event to support our important scientific research as we do not receive any funding from Government. Our on-going national Riverfly Census has clearly identified the shocking state of some of our freestone rivers and chalkstreams. But there is much more that needs to be done in terms of research and providing the evidence and data needed to protect our rivers and aquatic wildlife, as well as identifying workable solutions. We hope that as many people as possible who love to fish or just enjoy these unique river environments will support us and join in the competition to bid for some exceptional experiences."

The S&TC Annual Online auction opens on Monday 18th September (when registration opens at www.salmon-trout.org).

For more information or to donate auction lots, please contact: Veronica Kruger on email: auction@salmon-trout.org.

Norfolk chalkstream still under threat from pollution

We have just completed the second year of our unique three-year national Riverfly Census. The census aims to assess the health of our English and Welsh rivers through monitoring water insects that live below the surface.

This important research has revealed that nationally no significant improvement in the condition of our rivers and chalkstreams has occurred on the 12 core study rivers included over the past two years. The results from the River Wensum indicate that pollution is a significant concern for this chalk stream.

The threat to our rivers has moved from industrial pollution to a range of more subtle but equally damaging impacts from excess phosphates and fine sediments. These enter our waters from sources such as farming and road run-off, poorly treated sewage, septic tanks, new developments and in certain areas discharges from watercress and fish farms.

Five sites were surveyed on the Wensum: Doughton Bridge, Fakenham Common, Pensthorpe Park, Sennowe Bridge and Bintry Mill. Mayfly species richness is under the level that would be expected for the middle reaches of a healthy chalkstream at all sites. In spring and autumn, sediment was at or above the level considered to have a detrimental impact on the invertebrate community for all five sites. Phosphorus levels were also at or above the level of concern at four sites in spring and two in autumn. Taken together, the spring and autumn results in 2016 show the Wensum's water quality is under severe pressure from sedimentation and phosphate.

Dr Janina Gray, Head of Science at S&TC said:

"The results from the 2016 spring and autumn counts are concerning and reflect an increasing level of pollution entering this important chalkstream. Although the Wensum story is mostly negative, we were very encouraged by the passion of the farmers to help restore the river when we met last year. It will take time to get the river back to a healthy condition, but I am sure the dedication of the farmer's working on their stretches of the Wensum will help to ensure ecological improvement occurs over the next few years."

Understanding why and to what extent riverfly numbers, such as blue-winged olives, are declining is the first step in the process of safeguarding the aquatic environment.

Nick Measham, Freshwater Campaigns Manager at S&TC said:

"The aim of our Riverfly Census is to provide an accurate picture of water quality, to gauge the problems we are facing and to identify workable solutions to restore degraded watercourses. To do this, we analyse the invertebrates down to individual species rather than families. The increase in resolution is akin to moving from a magnifying glass to a microscope. The evidence from our Census is irrefutable. Increased phosphates and fine sediments are having a disastrous impact on invertebrate communities in our rivers. Loss of flylife causes major disruption to the delicate balance of the aquatic food chain, with fish, mammals and bird populations suffering as a result."

As can be seen from the results of S&TC Riverfly Census on the Wensum it is imperative that people who care about their local river start to act now.

Nick Measham explains:

"Our rivers and chalkstreams are wonderful places of solace. However, although these rivers may appear healthy, our research shows that things aren't always how they seem."

Current river monitoring is often not picking up the pressures these rivers face. We are therefore calling for local people to challenge and act for their rivers

We would like local people to help change the way our rivers are managed by demanding better protection and monitoring. We would urge them to get in touch with us so that we can take forward issues with local MPs or the Environment Agency. This is a call to arms to everyone to help save our rivers and the important aquatic wildlife that clean water supports.

For further information on the Riverfly Census or to contact Salmon & Trout Conservation, please email: lauren@salmon-trout.org

Mounting evidence of need to modernise salmon farming – collapse of salmon run in South-West Highlands

This year’s run of salmon in the most closely monitored river in Argyll is on course to be the lowest on record. The salmon count on the River Awe has hit an all-time low after 30 weeks of the season.

Last year’s total of 807 fish was only slightly above the all-time lowest count. This year it is running at only one third of the 2016 count. If this continues the final total will struggle to reach 400. This would be by far the lowest count of returning salmon to the biggest river in the South-West Highlands since records began in 1965.

River Awe salmon count

The Awe is a short river, draining Scotland’s longest loch (Loch Awe), with a hydro-electric dam at its head. There is a fish lift and a counter in the dam. The flow regime is such that fish can run the river any day of the year; almost all the fish are destined for the headwaters and thus there is a full river count which is almost unaffected by the weather.

Roger Brook, Chairman of the Argyll District Salmon Fishery Board, said:

“The Scottish Government has promoted the continued expansion of the salmon aquaculture industry whilst refusing to implement adequate control on the siting of farms and the levels of sea lice on the farms. We call upon Scottish Government to insist that future farms are sited away from the probable migration routes. The worst existing farms, both in terms of location and lice control, should now be closed.”

Mr Brook continued:

“Rivers such as the Awe are facing an uneconomic future but the government appears to care nothing about our iconic west Highland salmon and the important west coast tourist industry associated with recreational fishing. We are facing a very precarious future.”

Andrew Graham-Stewart, Director of Salmon and Trout Conservation Scotland (S&TC Scotland) said:

“Since the arrival of intensive salmon farming, numbers of mature west Highland sea trout have crashed. The decline in wild salmon numbers has not thus far been as extreme but it now appears that in the southern section of the west Highlands the decline is accelerating into a free fall. Despite all the warnings regarding the consequences of pursuing the unfettered growth of salmon farming without any meaningful controls to protect wild fish, successive Scottish Governments have blundered on with this policy.”

In an attempt to quantify the effect of salmon farming, a comparison can be made between salmon catches on the East coast of Scotland and the west coast between the Mull of Kintyre and Ardnamurchan Point (South-West Highlands). Between 1970 and 2014 rod catches of salmon on the East coast increased by almost 40%. Over the same time period rod catches in the South-West Highlands declined by 50%. See here.

Juvenile salmon migrating from rivers in the South-West Highlands must run the gauntlet close to lice-producing salmon farms not only in the immediate area but also the whole way up the west coast before they reach open ocean, free of aquaculture. Throughout this coastal migration they are vulnerable to infestation by deadly sea lice. It stands to reason that, the more salmon farms that outgoing juvenile salmon have to negotiate past on their migration to the North Atlantic feeding grounds, the less likely they are to survive.

The other major river in the South-West Highlands is the Lochy, which enters the sea by Fort William. The published rod catch of salmon to the end of July was 33, summed up by the river’s management as “the worst start in recent times.” The catch to the end of July was just 27% of the five year average for the same period.

In June, the Scottish Parliament’s Rural Economy and Connectivity Committee, in response to a formal Petition lodged in the Scottish Parliament in February 2016 by S&TC Scotland seeking protection for wild salmonids from sea lice from Scottish salmon farms, agreed to launch an Inquiry (scheduled for early 2018) into salmon farming in Scotland and the issues we have raised in throughout our salmon farm reform campaign.

We believe that a future is possible where Scottish salmon farming and wild fish can both thrive. In the medium term this can only be achieved by moving farming into closed containment tank systems, thus preventing the spread of disease and parasites from the farms to wild salmon and sea trout. In the meantime effective regulation of farms to protect wild fish is long overdue.

Unprecedented collapse of salmon run in South-West Highlands underlines failure of Scottish Government to protect wild fish from the catastrophically negative impact of salmon farming

This year's run of salmon in the most closely monitored river in Argyll is on course to be the lowest on record. The salmon count on the River Awe has hit an all-time low after 30 weeks of the season.

Last year's total of 807 fish was only slightly above the all-time lowest count. This year it is running at only one third of the 2016 count. If this continues the final total will struggle to reach 400. This would be by far the lowest count of returning salmon to the biggest river in the South-West Highlands since records began in 1965.

River Awe salmon count

The Awe is a short river, draining Scotland's longest loch (Loch Awe), with a hydro-electric dam at its head. There is a fish lift and a counter in the dam. The flow regime is such that fish can run the river any day of the year; almost all the fish are destined for the headwaters and thus there is a full river count which is almost unaffected by the weather.

Roger Brook, Chairman of the Argyll District Salmon Fishery Board, said:

"The Scottish Government has promoted the continued expansion of the salmon aquaculture industry whilst refusing to implement adequate control on the siting of farms and the levels of sea lice on the farms. We call upon Scottish Government to insist that future farms are sited away from the probable migration routes. The worst existing farms, both in terms of location and lice control, should now be closed."

Mr Brook continued:

"Rivers such as the Awe are facing an uneconomic future but the government appears to care nothing about our iconic west Highland salmon and the important west coast tourist industry associated with recreational fishing. We are facing a very precarious future."

Andrew Graham-Stewart, Director of Salmon & Trout Conservation Scotland (S&TC Scotland), said:

"Since the arrival of intensive salmon farming, numbers of mature west Highland sea trout have crashed. The decline in wild salmon numbers has not thus far been as extreme but it now appears that in the southern section of the west Highlands the decline is accelerating into a free fall."

Mr Graham-Stewart added:

"Despite all the warnings regarding the consequences of pursuing the unfettered growth of salmon farming without any meaningful controls to protect wild fish, successive Scottish Governments have blundered on with this policy."

In an attempt to quantify the effect of salmon aquaculture, a comparison can be made between salmon catches on the East coast of Scotland and the west coast between the Mull of Kintyre and Ardnamurchan Point (South-West Highlands). Between 1970 and 2014 rod catches of salmon on the East coast increased by almost 40%. Over the same time period rod catches in the South-West Highlands declined by 50%. See here.

Juvenile salmon migrating from rivers in the South-West Highlands must run the gauntlet close to lice-producing salmon farms not only in the immediate area but also the whole way up the west coast before they reach open ocean, free of aquaculture. Throughout this coastal migration they are vulnerable to infestation by deadly sea lice. It stands to reason that, the more salmon farms that outgoing juvenile salmon have to negotiate past on their migration to the North Atlantic feeding grounds, the less likely they are to survive.

The other major river in the South-West Highlands is the Lochy, which enters the sea by Fort William. The published rod catch of salmon to the end of July was 33, summed up by the river's management as "the worst start in recent times." The catch to the end of July was just 27% of the five year average for the same period. See http://www.fishpal.com/Scotland/Lochaber/lochy/?dom=Pal

In June, the Scottish Parliament's Rural Economy and Connectivity Committee, in response to a formal Petition lodged in the Scottish Parliament in February 2016 by S&TC Scotland seeking protection for wild salmonids from sea lice from Scottish salmon farms, agreed to launch an Inquiry (scheduled for early 2018) into salmon farming in Scotland and the issues raised by S&TC Scotland.

We believe that a future is possible where Scottish salmon farming and wild fish can both thrive but in the medium term this can only be achieved by moving farming into closed containment tank systems, thus preventing the spread of disease and parasites from the farms to wild salmon and sea trout. In the meantime effective regulation of farms to protect wild fish is long overdue.

Issued by Andrew Graham-Stewart (telephone 01863 766767 or 07812 981531) on behalf of Salmon & Trout Conservation Scotland.

 

Aliens in the app! Our invasive species series

Invasive Species Series

We are releasing an invasive species series, an update the S&TC river invertebrate app, so users can now identify creatures in their rivers that shouldn’t be there!

The update contains detailed images on two non-native shrimp – the demon shrimp and the killer shrimp. These shrimps are very bad news for our native shrimp (Gammarus pulex) as they destroy habitats and out-compete them for survival.

Let us know of any sightings of these aliens and report them to your local Environment Agency as a matter of urgency.

For all water users, by simply following the Check Clean Dry process – you can do your bit to stop the spread of invasive species.

Find out more about our app and download it.

invasive spcecies

New research project aims to help tackle pollution in Welsh rivers

The worrying increase in the pollution of rivers in Wales has led to the launch of a three-year scientific monitoring programme by Salmon & Trout Conservation Cymru (S&TC Cymru), which aims to assess the health of our valuable freshwater environments.

The study in Wales follows on from the existing Riverfly Census on 12 rivers in England over the past two years, which has already identified that many of the country's rivers and chalkstreams are suffering.

Richard Garner Williams, S&TC's National Officer for Wales, explains the science:

"Last autumn saw the start of our innovative Riverfly Census monitoring programme in Wales. This highly informative method of analysis aims to assess the health of our rivers through monitoring the strength and diversity of freshwater invertebrate communities. The loss of the aquatic stages in the lifecycles of invertebrates such as caddisflies and mayflies causes major disruption to the delicate balance of the aquatic food chain, with fish, mammals and bird populations suffering as a result.

Significantly, different invertebrate species have unique tolerances to specific types of pollution. Therefore, the presence or absence of a species provides an excellent indicator of the underlying ecological condition of our rivers and accurately pin-points potential pollution sources."

The threat to our rivers has moved from industrial pollution to a range of more subtle but equally damaging impacts, including the pollution from some forms of intensive agricultural production, which can be toxic to river insects – a vital part of the food chain within rivers.

The three rivers included in the Riverfly Census in Wales - the Clwyd, Usk and Cleddau Ddu or Eastern Cleddau - represent a good geographical spread across the country. Over the next few years we will be able to gather crucial evidence about the condition of these rivers and, when problems are identified, to develop workable solutions to reverse the decline in biodiversity and water quality.

Richard Garner Williams said:

"The results from the 2016 autumn sampling have formed an important baseline for measuring the condition of these rivers in subsequent years. Early results on the Eastern Cleddau and, to a lesser extent the Clwyd, indicate that agricultural pollution may be taking its toll. In contrast, the early results on the River Usk are more promising, but there is never any room for complacency and we need more data over future years to provide an accurate picture."

Dr Janina Gray, Head of Science with S&TC said:

"Understanding why and to what extent riverfly numbers, such as blue-winged olives, are declining is the first step in the process of safeguarding the aquatic environment. We are using our results in England to help fuel real improvements on our rivers. For example, we have worked with the local Environment Agency on the Test and Itchen in Hampshire to agree bespoke targets for mayfly species to drive improvements. We now want to be just as forensic in Welsh rivers!"

Richard Garner Williams continued:

"Pollution incidents are occurring far too frequently in Wales, especially in the milkfields of West Wales, where waste products from intensive dairy production are having a devastating impact on the freshwater environment. This is a major concern for all of us who care about our rivers and aquatic wildlife. However, the results from our Riverfly Census will help to provide the scientific evidence needed to identify specific problems and to develop workable solutions in order to guide meaningful restoration and avoid further incidents. We look forward to working with Natural Resources Wales, the Welsh Government and other stakeholders to ensure this happens for the benefit of our rivers and the wild fish of Wales, both now and in the future."

For further information the Riverfly Census in Wales, please contact: Richard Garner Williams on: wales@salmon-trout.org.

Derbyshire Rivers put under the microscope in flylife study

We are in process of reporting the results from the second year of our unique three-year national Riverfly Census. The census aims to assess the health of our English and Welsh rivers through monitoring the water insect communities that live below the surface.

This important research has revealed that nationally no significant improvement in the condition of our rivers and chalkstreams has occurred on the initial 12 rivers included in the study over the past two years.

Dr Janina Gray, S&TC's Head of Science says:

"The message from our Census is that 2016 was yet another worrying year for freshwater habitats across the country from Cornwall to Northumberland. Where problems exist, sediment and phosphate remain the main threats that are polluting our Census rivers."

However, the river Wye in Derbyshire has bucked this trend and the results from the Census were very good overall although there were signs of some potential problems at two of the sites tested.

In contrast the river Dove did not fare so well and is showing signs of pollution as well as being impacted by invasive species like American signal crayfish and the demon shrimp.

Nick Measham, from S&TC says:

"The results of our Riverfly Census on the Wye were encouraging. We sampled five sites at Anglers Rest, Tideswell Brook, Cressbrook Mill, Bakewell and Rowsley. In the survey Rowsley was the best site as there was no sediment or phosphate impact and the spring mayfly species count was higher than any other site tested."

However, Nick Measham adds a cautionary note. He says:

"A worrying factor is that the Wye and the Dove are both part of the Trent catchment, and so strict biosecurity is essential in order to reduce the risk of the demon shrimp and the American signal crayfish impacting on the health of the River Wye in the future."

Unfortunately, the River Dove is starting to show signs of stress from pollution. Five sites were included in the survey at Hollinsclough, Milldale, Mayfield, Rocester and Hatton. Although most of these sites were impacted in some way from the polluting effects of sediment and phosphate, the researchers also detected a worrying increase in invasive species such as the demon shrimp. The count also revealed that Gammarus shrimp, which are an important food for many aquatic species, were either present in very small numbers or completely absent. On a healthy river numbers of Gammarus should be counted in their thousands.

Dr Gray continued:

"The evidence from our Census shows phosphates and sediment are having a disastrous impact on invertebrate communities in certain reaches of our rivers. They are toxic to invertebrates in isolation and more so in combination. Loss of flylife causes major disruption to the delicate balance of the aquatic food chain, with fish, mammals and bird populations suffering as a result. Understanding why and to what extent riverfly numbers, such as blue-winged olives, or Gammarus are declining is the first step in the process of safeguarding the aquatic environment. We are using these results to help fuel real improvements on our rivers. For example, we have worked with the local Environment Agency on the Test and Itchen in Hampshire to agree bespoke targets for mayfly species and Gammarus shrimp to drive action."

Nick Measham adds:

"Our rivers and chalkstreams are wonderful places of solace. However, although these rivers may appear healthy on the surface, our research shows that many are suffering underneath."

Current monitoring largely fails to pick up the pollution pressures these rivers are facing from sources such as farming, road run-off, poorly treated sewage, septic tanks, new developments and in certain areas discharges from fish farms. We are therefore calling for local people to challenge and act for their rivers.

Nick Measham explains:

"Although the Wye is currently recording a very positive result, we do not believe there is room for complacency. It is therefore vital that local people help change the way our rivers are managed by demanding better protection and monitoring, so that rivers like the Wye are kept in pristine condition. We can suggest training for people who wish to become more 'hands on' with monitoring the condition and quality of their own river. Alternatively get in touch with us so that we can take forward issues with local MPs or the Environment Agency. This is a call to arms to everyone to help save our rivers and the important aquatic wildlife that clean water supports."

For further information on the Riverfly Census or to contact Salmon & Trout Conservation, please email: lauren@salmon-trout.org

Vitacress and Salmon & Trout Conservation Join Forces on Water Quality

Salmon & Trout Conservation (S&TC) and Vitacress have joined forces to help reduce phosphate outputs from the watercress industry.

In-river phosphate and invertebrate sampling commissioned by us on the River Itchen, a Special Area of Conservation, has indicated the river is suffering for excess phosphates and fine sediment, from a variety of sources, which has resulted in the river being a shadow of its former self, despite its protected status.

Seizing on the opportunity presented by Vitacress’ plan to bring its Pinglestone Farm on the Itchen back to full commercial production in 2018, S&TC, together with the University of Portsmouth, will continuously monitor phosphate output throughout the process and work with Vitacress to develop effective farming and water management methods to resolve any issues uncovered by the monitoring.

Paul Knight, S&TC CEO said:

“We believe continuous monitoring of phosphate levels in industry discharges is the only way to fully capture seasonal peaks and better understand the impacts these discharges are having on the river.  We applaud Vitacress for working with us to go beyond the EA’s current monthly spot checks – to properly monitor the impact of the watercress industry on the river environment.  We will work together to ensure this data drives improvements in the rivers ecology, while ensuring watercress is a truly environmentally sustainable product”

Chris Hall, MD of Vitacress Salads said:

“We’re delighted to be working together with S&TC and the University of Portsmouth as part of our ongoing commitment to sustainable farming. The learnings from Pinglestone will be applied across all Vitacress’ watercress farms, and shared with the industry to develop best practice in watercress farming. This fits with Vitacress’ values and our commitment to deliver fresh, tasty, healthy and nutritious watercress whilst protecting the environments in which we farm.”

ORRI VIGF™SSON: 10 July 1942 – 1 July 2017

All at Salmon & Trout Conservation are very saddened to hear that Orri Vigfùsson has passed away. He did so much to save Atlantic salmon from the high seas netting that was such a great threat to the species, but at the same time he was determined that commercial netsmen should be properly compensated for giving up their licenses to fish for salmon. His stated objective was to "restore the abundance of wild salmon that formerly existed on both sides of the North Atlantic". That was an attitude that endeared him to both sides of the issue, and was the basis for his great success in helping to close down damaging commercial net fisheries throughout the Northern Hemisphere.

Amongst his many honours, Orri was made a Vice President of the Salmon & Trout Association (as we were then called) in the 1990s.

Orri was until very recently helping members of the England Fisheries Group on the Environment Agency’s 5-point recovery action for salmon, especially over the North east English coastal nets. He will be very sadly missed by all of us in the working group, as he will be by the host of other fisheries people with whom he came into contact around the world. Our thoughts are with his widow, Unnur, and the rest of his family.

RIP to a great salmon conservationist.

S&TC partners in EU project to provide vital research on salmon and sea trout populations in the English Channel

An environmental project that will provide vital research on rapidly declining salmon and sea trout (Salmonid) populations, is set to receive a multimillion pound investment from the EU’s Interreg France (Channel) England programme. The project is called SAMARCH (SAlmonid MAnagement Round the CHannel), which is being led by the Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust (GWCT).

SAMARCH is a cross-border project, with 10 partner organisations 5 in France and 5 in the UK. This project will use state of the art fish monitoring facilities on 5 rivers across the south of England and northern France, including the Freshwater Biological Association’s River Laboratory on the River Frome, the Environment Agency’s facilities on the River Tamar, the Institut National de Recherche Agronomique’s facilities on Rivers Scorff and Oir and their specialist fish research team, as well as the Agence Française pour la Biodiversité’s facilites on River Bresle. Other partners include the Universities of Bournemouth, Exeter and Agrocampus Ouest, and Salmon & Trout Conservation UK, Normandie Grands Migrateurs and Bretagne Grands Migrateurs.

SAMARCH will focus on the behaviour and mortality of salmonid populations in estuaries and coastal waters to determine where losses are greatest. It will also, use DNA analysis to map areas in the English channel that are important for sea trout, provide new information to improve the tools used by the regulatory bodies in England and France to manage their salmon stocks. For example, by providing novel information on the long term changes in the growth rates of salmon using historical salmon scale collections and improve our understanding of the ratio of male and female salmon that go to sea using DNA.

SAMARCH will engage with stakeholders and use the knowledge gathered during the 5 year project (2017 to 2022) to update regulations in both France and England on the management of salmonids in estuaries and coastal waters which, are hoped will realise an increase in salmon and sea trout.

The research is important because Atlantic salmon and sea trout, have declined by around 70% since the 1970s, they play a major role in coastal and river ecosystems and have a considerable economic importance through angling in Europe which is estimated to be worth as much as €1.2 billion a year.

Dylan Roberts, head of fisheries at GWCT and project manager, said: “Until recently, management has focused largely on addressing issues in freshwater. However, we know that more than 90% of salmon smolts that leave our rivers for their feeding grounds in the north Atlantic die at sea. Researching salmon in the sea has always been technically difficult, but recent developments in fish tracking technology, DNA methodologies and advances in data analysis techniques now enables us to quantify what proportion of this mortality occurs in the estuary and coastal areas, as well as their movements through these areas. SAMARCH will also sharpen the tools used to manage salmonid stocks and adjust our management strategies accordingly. In light of the recent growth of coastal renewable energy schemes, such as tidal lagoons and underwater turbines and their potential harm on fish populations, SAMARCH will gain knowledge to provide pertinent information to manage this risk. We are delighted that the Interreg programme has decided to support SAMARCH and we look forward to working with our partners over the next 5 years.”

SAMARCH has a total budget of 7.8 million euros with 69% funded by the Interreg France (Channel) England programme, representing a European Regional Development Fund contribution of 5.4 million euros.

William Beaumont a Senior Fisheries Scientist at GWCT with 2 sea trout from the River Frome, Dorset UK