Milk. A serious environmental threat?

So, here’s the shocking news about the potential of milk to pollute rivers.

Paul Knight, S&TC CEO writes,

One of the consequences of the coronavirus pandemic has been that the demand for milk has slumped and so dairy farmers have had to pour away their excess, cows still have to be milked, after all, so production cannot just stop.  In Wales, home of the new crop of mega dairy units, the rules state that unwanted milk should be poured into slurry storage if possible, and only sprayed onto fields if absolutely necessary.

Slurry from diary units is a consistent polluter of our rivers. It is sprayed onto fields and the first decent rain shower takes it straight into the nearest watercourse as run-off.  We have heard reports some farmers even dispose of slurry directly into rivers, often at night in an attempt to hide their nefarious activity. The results can be devastating for local fish stocks, because of oxygen depletion due to the micro-organisms feeding on the organic material in slurry.

So, here’s the shocking news about the potential of milk to pollute rivers.  Take treated human sewage as our baseline. A biological oxygen demand (BOD) of up to 60 mg of oxygen per litre of pollutant.  From this, these impacts have the following BOD:

No-one is yet suggesting that milk is finding its way into rivers, but the purpose of the above table is to show just how potentially polluting these agricultural waste products can be if they enter water courses. It is not so much that they are directly toxic to fish and water life, it is that they extract the oxygen out of the system to the extent that, in serious cases, all affected life will die as a consequence.

This is why S&TC is demanding government agencies are properly resourced to monitor watercourses effectively and enforce existing legislation.  We have the legislation, we just need the political will and funding to deal with those farmers who continue to pollute our rivers and damage wild fish stocks.

We are also determined to influence post-Brexit agricultural policies that incentivise farmers to invest in such infrastructure as new storage facilities for slurry or silage that don’t leak. But, while we lobby for these incentives to help farmers, we need the existing laws and regulations to be enforced. We are being fair to fish, not unfair to farmers.