S&TC launches first SmartRivers hub in Scotland

S&TC launches first SmartRivers hub in Scotland in partnership with Flow Country Rivers Trust.

The River Halladale is set to become the first river in Scotland to join SmartRivers, as Salmon and Trout Conservation continue trials of the innovative scheme.

The scheme, born out of the Riverfly Census, uses aquatic invertebrates as a diagnostic test to tell us about the health of rivers and possible pollutants affecting wild fish populations.

Nick Measham, S&TC Deputy CEO said:

 “We’re delighted to be able to support Flow Country Rivers Trust with our SmartRivers programme. SmartRivers is what S&TC is all about, turning science into meaningful real-world action, that here and now improves outcomes for wild fish and the wider habitat.  We are very much looking forward to working with FCRT over the coming years.”

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Quick and easy to deploy, but also producing powerful information. Polluters of rivers and streams in England have already been forced to take action.

"SmartRivers Delivering Results"

SmartRivers provides both information to assist with catchment management decisions, as well as establishing an insurance policy for rivers in the form of a benchmark of their health. Real world empirical evidence about the diversity of invertebrate species which form the foundation of the food web in rivers will support the indicative monitoring of conductivity, pH levels and fry numbers.

Reuben Sweeting, Head Ghillie on the River Halladale said:

“SmartRivers is the final piece of the puzzle.  It complements the range of monitoring already being carried out, helping to develop a fuller picture of the health of our rivers and, crucially, allowing us to better understand the potential they hold.

 Being part of the team to bring SmartRivers north to Scotland for the first time is very exciting.  With the opportunity to attain professional level benchmarking, combined with sampling and identification training, the benefits will be felt by all involved.”

A comprehensive online and field based training scheme, 1-2-1 support and good use of information technology, including a dedicated S&TC Invert ID App, ensures that local community groups themselves are able to monitor the water quality in their rivers to a near-professional standard.

Lauren Mattingley, SmartRivers Project Manager S&TC said:

 “We are overjoyed to be extending our water quality work into Scottish rivers. Ensuring young salmon and trout are as fit and healthy as possible before they migrate to sea is crucial for them to successfully complete their life cycles.

 It is astounding that tiny invertebrates can give us such vast insight into the quality of the water our young fish are being exposed to. Working with the FCRT volunteers on the Halladale is going to be fascinating.”

Benchmark monitoring on the River Halladale will be carried out in spring and autumn 2020. The first independent monitoring by the volunteers, under the auspices of the Flow Country Rivers Trust, will occur in spring 2021.

Alan Youngson, Scientific advisor, FCRT

"Over the last few years the FCRT and the local Fishery Boards have worked hard to build a better picture of the northern rivers and the salmon populations that they support. However, we still know very little about the invertebrate populations that the fish depend on for food. We look forward to learning much more from the professionals driving the Smart Rivers project."

John Mackay, Chairperson, Flow Country Rivers Trust said:

 “Currently the North of Scotland rivers are in very good health, but we are mindful of the deteriorating situation across the UK. We have a database of the juvenile numbers, biomass density and the water conductivity for all the 10 rivers in the FCRT area. The Smart Rivers project to measure the insect food supply will add to this database and provide a benchmark, which will hopefully give us advance warning of a change in our environment.”

 For more information about SmartRivers and how it could support your river management activities, please email: smartrivers@salmon-trout.org

 Please note: We can only run courses with groups of around 10 volunteers and not for individuals. However, if you are struggling to establish a 'hub' group your local Rivers Trust or Wildlife Trust may be able to help.

ENDS

Issued by Corin Smith comms@salmon-trout.org (T: 07463 576892)

Reporting with a purpose

S&TC is a national organisation and we use evidence from local case studies to help instigate policy changes that will benefit UK wild fish populations. But, this is just part of the value - we are making all our Riverfly Census findings available so they can be used to inform local management and drive action.

Each individual river report is based on three years of surveying data. Where possible, we have linked up our findings with other existing literature and data. Using the available information we suggest where local fishing and/or conservation groups can focus their management efforts to achieve the best health outcomes for each of the 12 original Census rivers.

Some of our local reports can be found on the slider below. Alternatively, visit the Riverfly Census page and scroll down to the map.